Live Interview with Dr. Osama Hamdy, Co-Author of The Diabetes Breakthrough

Event Details

Live Interview with Dr. Osama Hamdy, Co-Author of The Diabetes Breakthrough

Time: July 22, 2014 from 10am to 11am
Location: TuDiabetes homepage
Website or Map: http://www.TuDiabetes.org
Event Type: live interview, videochat
Organized By: Emily Coles
Latest Activity: Sep 17

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Event Description

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Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, is the founder and medical director of the obesity clinical program at the Joslin Diabetes Center. He is the creator of the Joslin Why WAIT™ program, the world’s first clinical program designed to help patients with diabetes lose weight and reverse the progressive course of their disease. Dr. Hamdy is the co-author, with Sheri Colberg, of The Diabetes Breakthrough a 12 week weight loss program modeled after Why WAIT.

The Diabetes Breakthrough (Harlequin, 2014) unlocks the formula for halting the progression of type 2 diabetes and erasing its damage. Dr. Hamdy offers a clinically proven, 12 week diet and fitness plan modeled after his Why WAIT™ program at Joslin Diabetes Center. Readers learn to create balanced, glucose-friendly meals using foods they love, which diabetes medications cause weight gain, how to combine strength and cardio training to drop pounds but not muscle, and strategies for breaking habits and reversing the negative thinking that stymies progress. The Diabetes Breakthrough makes it possible for everyone with diabetes to achieve the results Joslin patients have enjoyed:

  • A 50 to 60 percent reduction in medications
  • An average weight loss of 25 pounds in 12 weeks
  • A 50 percent success rate at keeping weight off for four years
  • 21 percent drop in numbers taking insulin

 

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Comment by ArleneA on July 22, 2014 at 11:00am

The low-carb plan has been the easiest way that I've used and I can imagine using it as a long-term lifestyle. I'm not hungry, I don't feel limited because there are so many attractive options. I enjoy proteins the most, anyway. :)

Comment by Emily Coles on July 22, 2014 at 9:34am

Great points, Brian and Feinman!  I'll be sure we discuss them :)

Comment by Brian (bsc) on July 22, 2014 at 8:50am

The paper mentioned by Feinman is available at Harvard, presumably courtesy of co-author Frank Hu. I checked the "Diabetes Breakthrough" book out of the library and commented on this over at diabetesdaily. I was disappointed at the claims for "scientifically proven" diet breakthrough that basically gave the same old, same old. A diet with at least 45% of calories from carbs and focused on fat and calorie restriction. I've followed a low carb diet for going on a decade without any problems with adherence (of course I don't restrict fat or calories as Dr. Hamdy recommends). In addition to personally finding a low carb diet very successful in managing my diabetes I have also been surprised at the lack of scientific objectivity given to consideration of low carb diets for which there is seemingly compelling evidence.  And Feinman is modest, along with 25 other worldwide co-authors, he just published an article in Nutrition arguing that carb restriction should be a first line approach to T2. 

Although I have a conflict with today's discussion I would like to ask Dr. Hamdy to address why he believes carb restriction is not an option as a first dietary approach.

ps. And for those who complain that they can't find any recipes for this new fangled low carb fad diet, I recommend that they look at some of the tasty recipes and menus in this little classic.

Comment by Feinman on July 22, 2014 at 6:30am

Dr. Hamdy and coworkers have published a paper in Lancet (2014 Jun 7;383(9933):1999-2007"Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: dietary components and nutritional strategies."

The article is not available without subscription but it contains the following comment "However, highly restricted low carbohydrate and high protein diets tend to have low adherence in the long term. To improve longterm cardiovascular disease outcomes, the healthy types of fat and protein should be emphasized." That is the last thing that is mentioned about low-carb diets. I think that dismissing a diet that has been helpful to many people with diabetes is inappropriate. The idea that low-carb diets have "have low adherence" is not documented. I have discussed this with Dr. Hamdy privately but people who have experience with low-carb diets may wish to discuss this with him on the video conference.

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