I have been thinking that I go low A LOT more than other people with type 1 / type 1.5. I wanted to check though! How often do you have low blood sugar/hypoglycemia?

Recently I go low once often twice a DAY. I know this is a sign of not good control (even if the A1c is ok) and that I need to improve. Part of the problem is that I wake up low often (what I call my "reverse dawn phenomenon").

I was just curious how many times you go low... to know what I should expect!

Tags: hypoglycemia, low

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Being 29 tells me something is very wrong with your pump settings. Just
because you're on the pump doesn't mean it's an easy fix to control.
You have to be very aware of your basal settings and your food intake.
You have to be even more diligent when on the pump, in contrast to injections.
That really disturbs me when I hear of people going too low, it does significant
damage to our bodies. Be careful of the pump it has a way of lulling some of us
into making everything seem automatic,that would be furthest from the truth.
I agree, I have noticed before the pump that i could have a bite here and there and not move much in numbers. Now I have to account for all food, and as accurate as I can. When I do, its a dream.
Ray, I completely agree. I think having type 1 and using injections is like having a 4 year old child. You have to keep track of them, plan for the next 4 hours or so, and do lots of well-child checkups. I think having a pump is like having an infant---much more difficult. You have to keep track of them all the time! The regular population thinks that the pump takes away our problems. But since it isn't a smart pump, we have to be smart for it, which means even more frequent testing.
Kristin, I think "low" is a relative thing. For me, low is a sub 35 BG. I feel low when I'm in my 40's, but still in control & take glucose tabs to get higher. But low where I'm in trouble & need help from others is sub 35 & unfortunately that happens. Maybe, once a week for me.
Every time I commented on this site I mentioned my lows. They were, yes, I said WERE everyday, and the numbered varied from 2-5 times. Now that I am a few weeks into pumping, my life has totaly changed. My lows still come but maybe at 3 a week, and low for me now is 65. Pre-pump I could hit 40 and think I was at 60ish, it was scarry. I also went from an A1C of 13.4 to 7.8 to 6.0. Now don't get me wrong, its a good number, but it came with misery. I HATE being low. I always feel out of control, and if anyone knows me - that just can't be. I thank this new found family for this past year since my Dx, without all of the posts and answers, opinions, thoughtful advice, I would never understood my condition the way I do now. No Dr., or educator can tell you "how it is" if they are not T1 themself. I appreciate everyone who opens up here to tell us your experiences, it puts me back "in control" of my life.
Marnie, thanks for your posts. I really like hearing from you.
Just recently I made a lot of adjustments on my pump settings and my lows are less frequent, only took me 7 years of pumping, and I know it won't last, but......

I changed my target setting from 100 to 120 and I changed my correction factor from 1 unit per 70 to 1 unit to 100, and I am experiencing less lows. I also changed my carb ratio at dinner time, but sometimes I have a hard time believing my settings and over zap, grrrr!!!

I also really watch the insulin on board and try to take that into account and trust my settings, that is the hard part as I want immediate back to normal when high, I am not patient. :)
I have been insulin dependent for 54 years and didn't have trouble with lows until the last 5-6 years. I don't know when I'm having a low until it's about too late. 3 years ago I got an insulin pump along with a sensor. My blood sugars are better now and of course, when the sensor says I'm around 80, I will check my blood sugar and eat something if needed. I am also sure to check my blood sugar before I drive anyhwere. I have pulled over several times, thankfully, and found my blood sugar is low. It is a constant battle, but don't give up. Janet
I have been type 1 for 33 years and didn't have trouble with my lows until 3 or so years ago either. Hmmmm....Why? I did ask on here when it first happened as I was unaware of the consequences of going so low and that I could go into a coma. I had no idea what was going on with me. I didn't realize it was so common!! My mother called 911 and when they injected me with glucose it was like stepping away from a dream and into reality. Now I am terrified and believed that a little continuous high was best - not to go low if at all possible. Wasn't too lucky last December. Went running to the fridge to get juice in the middle of the night (moved into a new place and didn't have juice by my bed - never have done that EVER!!!!). My legs gave out and I broke my ankle at the fridge. Lucky me. Guess I was lucky because I really could have died that night. I live alone. No more lows for me if at all possible. I'll take high any day!!!
P.S. Taking niacin (flush free) used to help me "feel" my lows again, but not anymore.
Hi -

I go in stretches. When my control is especially tight (low average/low standard deviation), I'll often have mild lows in the 60s. I don't go into the 50s very often and rarely visit the 40s or below (knock wood). In the last 10 days, I see 2 50's and 5 60's.

Maurie
Way too tight "brother"... cut back before it kills you.

Stuart
I go low about once or twice a day BUT those lows are not under 65 they are typically between 65 and 75 so they are really easy for me to treat and it works for me because I feel lows at that level anyway. If I didn't feel lows at 65 it would be a problem I think, because then I'd be getting in the 40's and 50's too often and too easily.

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