Hi,

I'm hoping to be on an insulin pump by December. After studying the available pumps, I've narrowed it down to MiniMed and Animas. I really like the sound of both, and I can't make up my mind! So could you fill me in with some pros/cons of each? Particularly recurring cons -- I've noticed, reading through the posts on here, that Animas pumps seem to die often. Are there any other similar, recurring traits of which I should be aware?

Thank you all so much for your help!

Pat

Tags: Animas, MiniMed

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From the perspective of my online diary project I would prefer a pump that can nearly act as a digital diary. The pump comparison stated for the animas "cannot recall blood glucose or carb history" which clearly disqualifies as a diary. I may be possible to download the data but I am sceptical. The medtronic capabilities are much more advanced in that respect: bolus wizard, logging of bg, carbs, insulin for carbs and insulin for correction.
The ping does this, although it comes from the meter not the pump.
Hi Stephen, thanks for this clarification. As long as the digital diary capabilites are present I am fine with that. Seems that the cited comparison is a little to reduced to clarify this point. One follow up to the Animas + Ping combination: Is it possible to download the data from these devices and to save it as XML or CSV file?
I'm satisfied with the Animas software. I'm not sure what the file type is, but the database allows for very customized reports sortable by just about any variable. You can save them as a pdf and send it to your endo. The standard reports are good enough to spot tends, compare various time periods and do averages. I know my endo loves the reports i email her.
i just started my animas pump a little while ago, I love it..i don't know about it dying tho, my only problem is if i suspend it it beeps all the time...other than that...no complaints
I think if you turn off your "alert" or it might be "reminder" sounds in the sound set up, it stops that beeping. It really got on my nerves and wears your battery out much quicker.
Pat - I was lucky in being able to test drive the MM522 for 4 months. I had no issues with how it worked - I just didn't find the service to be that desirable. I originally went with it because of wanting to be on the CGMS as well.

I then was able to test drive an Animas 2020 - and the silly thing that won me over with it ... the beautiful blue colour of the casing (see I told you it was silly) - reminded me of my first car - Honda Civic back in the 80's. It is also smaller in size - and because of being in the water - that was a bonus. Also, the screen is much easier to read. After 4 months - I decided to plunk down my money for that one (have it paid off now!). I find the customer service to be much better then Medtronic as well.

Both pumps do the same thing - it's really just a personal thing (e.g. pretty colour!!!) as well as the fact that it's easy to use. I am still not using my Animas to its full advantage - maybe if I'd had an Animas pump educator I would be using it correctly - but for now - I'm very happy.

NB: I'm just realising now that this was posted over a year ago after typing all this out - so did you ever decide on which pump to purchase ?

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