LOL! I don’t know why I decided to make this list, since I have nothing to hide I thought I would blog about My 7 “Bad” Habits as a Diabetic. I am not perfect and if anyone with diabetes say they are, you should play “knock, knock” on their head to make sure their brain is still there, lol.

Here I go…

1. Falling asleep before checking my bg’s!!! I have wake up at 5 am to make it to work by 7 am. I have to get Niya and myself ready before 6:30 am; I have to be out the door by 6:30. My Husband has a new duty, lol WAKE ME UP BEFORE YOU GO TO BED DUTY! I am actually getting a little better at testing before I fall asleep.

2. Reese’s Peanut butter cups…OMG!!! just thinking about them makes me want to hop in the car and drive to the gas station…lol I guess if I walked I could “Walk it off”…haha

3. Doritos (nacho cheese), and BBQ chips…I can not keep these 2 items in my house. I have to keep them out of site, out of my mind because I can eat them all day long. Not good for my girlish figure.

4. Changing LANCETS! When I was first DX I changed my lancet all the time, lol everytime I tested. The last 6 months I haven’t been good at doing it. I am going to work on this also.

5. Walking Barefoot! Here is another thing I use to do when I was first DX. I always walked around with shoes or socks on, scared I would get an infection. Plus, my ENDO said I should always have something on my feet. I stopped doing this about a year ago. If I have to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night, I don’t want to pee my pants (we usually wait to the last minute to go pee). It’s either shoes, socks or pee my pants!!! What would you choose?

6. Washing hands before testing- Ok! I know I am not the only person who doesn’t wash their hands all the time before testing their bg’s. I learned a lesson, now I make sure I have something with me to clean my hands. If you touch something sweet it makes your bg’s higher than what they are; not good for someone who is insulin dependent.

7. Diabetic Preaching- I didn’t know if I mentioned this or not but I am Certified to Preach Diabetes to people…hahaha not! I do have a bad habit of trying to tell people who don’t take care of their Diabetes, how to do so! I am trying to work on it, if you don’t want to know the “Truth” don’t ask. I have toned down a lot ***patting myself on the back****

Here is my list, I came clean. I admit it’s not really at that bad! I know there are a few things I need to improve on. I think tomorrow I am going to blog about MY 7 “Good” habits as a Diabetic.

I shared mines, what are yours?

Tags: habits, living

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I leave dozens of used strips in my meter case, but I figure it's not hurting anyone, and has no impact on my diabetes management or wellbeing so I'm not too concerned about it. It bothers my hubby way more than it will ever bother me. If I ever get kidnapped, I'll use them like breadcrumbs for my rescuers to find me since they even have my DNA on them.
I see that a lot her on Tu Diabetes, people keeping their strips. Is there a reason for this? I just throw it out after I test unless I'm not near a trash can. Am I creating some toxic garbage????
These sound very familiar:
1. Walking barefoot even on sidewalks!
2. Why would you change a lancet?
3. Anything chocolate - the good stuff won't hurt
4. Diabetic preaching
5. Washing hands - maybe that's why I am sitting here with a bad cold
6. Leaving used strips all over the place
7. Not using lotions on my very dry, itchy skin
Is it significant that most of the responders seem to be female?

My top seven, in no particular order:

1. Not having backup supplies when I go out (batteries, glucose tabs, strips)
2. Littering the house and work area with test strip (maybe I should eat them - yech)
3. Ignoring pump alarms.
4. Eating mixed nuts on the assumption that they have no carbs (eat enough and they've got plenty)
5. Not bolusing for snacks (it's just a little bit)
6. Finger-licking (before and after)
7. Not talking about diabetes enough.

Terry
It is not significant most respondents are female...we just like to gab a lot...LOL.

1. Not enough exercise
2. Not washing my hands before testing.
3. Barefoot in the summer always.
4. Not changing my lancet .... EVER. And reusing pen needles.
5. Skipping lunch on weekends...I pay for that one most of the time.
6. Waking up late on weekends.
7. Not carrying supplies for lows with me, have gotten caught on that one many times. Not fun when you are in the middle of the mall in a diabetic low.
I definitely do your #6 - and then I eat breakfast/lunch at around noon, when I do finally wake up.
1. Bolusing without testing
2. Forgetting to Bolus when I eat
3. Forgetting to test
4. Not changing my site after 3 days
5. Not changing the lancet
6. Drinking with friends (I live in a college town)
7. Succumbing to my roommates infamous baking abilities
I. Walk barefoot all the time
2. Don't wash hands before testing
3. reuse lancets and needles before i got my pump.
4. I do cheat and have chocolate every once in a while.
5. Leaving used strips everywhere in fact there is some even at work sadly.
6. Forgetting to test blood sugar before bed. Recently have been falling asleep on the couch.
7. Drinking on occasion.
1. You can change a lancet?
2. People actually write down their blood sugar readings?
3. Exer-what?
4. I like to drop the used strips on the floor just to make my wife mad at me lol : )
5. People wear shoes and socks?
6. Now that I have a pump and can dial in the carbs, I can eat anything with a nutritional info label, right?
7. You mean I am not supposed to treat a low by eating until I feel better? HA!
I don't do # 2 either. I got one of those cables that links my meter to my PC, so I figure that takes care of it.

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