My ACR has been consistently above the normal ranges for the past 3 years, the ratio has ranged from 40 to 313, though the average results have been between 100 - 200.

All my other lab results are perfect creatine ( 1 or less), lipids, HBA1C (below 6 always). My urine routine does not show any trace of protien too.

I am also taking blood pressure meds to bring the ACR down but that seems to be in vain.

I really want to lower my ACR down, have decided to turn veg and reduce animal protien as much as possible.

Request for any advice on diet or exercise that will help me in lowering the ACR levels.

Views: 187

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

What is ACR?

ACR is the Albumin to Creatinine Ratio (ACR). It would be best to consult a kidney specialist (a nephrologist) about your test results. I think most people would tell you that the best way to avoid kidney complications is to maintain tight blood sugar control which seem to have done. If you do have kidney damage, restricting protein may be a good measure, but you really need to consult a doctor.

And I have to tell you, you seem awful young to have kidney damage, especially if you maintained good blood sugar control. Some people do have abnormal results and it is normal, but only a doctor can give you credible advice.

Based on the following, 30-300 (men) 30-400 (women) seems to be the normal range, depending on the unit of measure used.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microalbuminuria

Mine has been high on occasion, but on re-test always back to normal. So it is usually advised for several tests to confirm. Also the article notes what can cause false results:

An early morning sample is preferred. The patient should refrain from heavy exercises 24 hours before the test. A repeat test should be done 3 to 6 months after the first positive test for microalbuminuria. Lastly, the test is inaccurate in a person with too much or too little muscle mass. This is due to the variation in creatinine level which is produced by the muscle.

Those numbers denote Microalbuminuria, which basically means abnormally high levels of albumin are being spilled, but not levels high enough to be considered proteinuria.

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

DHF Partners with HelpAround in an Effort to Connect People Touched by Diabetes

  Leer en español Technology has the amazing ability to ease the stress associated with diabetes; It simply makes our lives a little more bearable. That’s why we are excited to announce DHFs partnership with HelpAround. This new application will help Read on! →

La Diabetes Hands Foundation y HelpAround uniendo las personas tocadas por la diabetes

  Para nuestra comunidad de diabetes la tecnología ha venido a llenar muchos vacíos y a hacer de nuestras vidas un poco mas llevaderas. Eso mismo nos proporciona una nueva aplicación de geo-localización llamada HelpAround (Ayuda a tu alrededor). HA Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)


DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Bradford (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)

Gary (has type 2)

David (dns) (type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service