Thanks for your responses and thoughts......etc. etc.

I'm still riding the 250's ( better than the 300-400 which is what my fiance meant) and I'll be getting labs done tomorrow along with probable insulin.

High BG and HYperthyroid are obviously hard on the body and emotions. I understand it's important to "train" your significant other, to have patience with them, to OWN your disease, to control your BG and if it's not controlled to accept that insulin might be the way to go. I get all of that.

I guess I should have explained more. I have a brand new Endo. He is working on getting me well, albeit slowly. I am getting a ton of lab work done tomorrow (fasting - including no meds). I am also having thyroid testing done tomorrow and the next day to find out what the heck is going on. This is not a long - on going thing - this just happened. My body is in chaos and to be perfectly honest I'm a tad scared.

The point of my post was to see if anyone else had had frustrations with their significant others regarding this disease. I appreciate some of the advice and definitely appreciate the kindness of some of your responses.

I'm starting to get the same questions and responses now so I am going to close the discussion.





So I have been a well controlled Type 2 since 2008 when I was diagnosed. Mostly I've been on 500mg of Metformin.
Recently I had my yearly check-up and My A1c was 8.6 and I also found out that I have hYperthyroidism - again.
I've been a bad diabetic in that I've only tested a few times a week - I have always had good control - fasting around 90 - 120 typically - so if I had tested more often I would have known something was wrong.
I had been beyond thirsty for a while, peeing like crazy and incredibly moody.

I am now on 2000mg of Met. and 2mg of Amaryl. My BG has come down from 350 - 450 to 250. I still feel horrible but have a million tests this coming week so I am certain I'll get a higher dose of Amaryl - he even mentioned Insulin...All very scary stuff for me.

The hYperthyroid is complicating the diabetes and I am just in a horrendous mood.

Enough back story -

My fiance knows I'm diabetic, but he doesn't seem all that interested in retaining the information I tell him or reading up on it. He is incredibly supportive, loving and does way too much for me in regards to other health issues. He is truly amazing.

Here is the Irk - I have been in the 250's every day for the last 5 days since I started the Amaryl - I still feel horrible and when he asked me today what my blood sugar was and I said 248 (fasting) he said, Oh, well that's not too bad.

Now, why on earth did I get SO angry about this? I feel alone in this, I feel scared and sick and I just want to escape. He said he was just trying to be positive - but It felt much more like a blow-off or just an absolutely ignorant statement.

Am I Crazy? Has anyone else dealt with significant others that just don't seem to "get it" ??

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Here is the Irk - I have been in the 250's every day for the last 5 days since I started the Amaryl - I still feel horrible and when he asked me today what my blood sugar was and I said 248 (fasting) he said, Oh, well that's not too bad.
What did you eat today?
Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia
Everything in Moderation - Except laughter

Thanks for the additional info. That is certainly not an excessive carb load sufficient to lead to this:

I have been in the 250's every day for the last 5 days since I started the Amaryl - I still feel horrible and when he asked me today what my blood sugar was and I said 248 (fasting)

Which is why I asked the question. Although your breakfast and lunch are 15.5gm and 15gm more than I can handle personally without spiking :) Consider applying this technique; it should help but I agree that it may not be a total solution: Test, Review, Adjust

It seems that you may need insulin as the Amaryl is inadequate. Have you been tested to see what your own insulin production is?

Please forgive your fiancé; be happy that he cares enough to ask, even if he doesn't understand the answers. Try not to be angry; you want him around long enough to gain that understanding.

Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter

248 way too high.

But; I would check liver carefully checking out dawn effect through 3:00 am to 8:00am and see how much that is adding.

I would also check to see if liver can source proper amount of glucose when BG drops sub 80 without dumping the whole pail of its storage . Also, liver can do dumps when it should not even with a high finger tip BG. Do not munch through digestion zone after eating a meal. SOme times as gut/intestine glucose wearing off and eating a new snack can trigger a liver dump that should not occur.

Are you on metformin?
You need a new Dr. IMHO.....Fasting of 248 is awfiul to me.
Hi amy. No you aren't crazy. Seems like our type 2 pancreases (?) kind of 'give up' after a while. I started insulin 10 years ago after having had Big D (the gift that keeps on giving) for 10 years and taking metformin and the others. High BP too so on meds for that as well. Doc said 'insulin'..I freaked...then started shots. This week I am getting an insulin pump. If I had it all to do again...I'd have looked into pumps way back then. I'm getting an OmniPod as it has no tubing. Best of luck and this site is great and has answered a lot of my questions and helped me (and prob wiil continue to help) figure out about the pump.

Fiance should take a Medtronic 'Insulin Forward' class near your home w/you. It's free and you learn a bunch about diabetes. Of course they want you to get a pump but the class is free and supposed to be educational as opposed to a sales pitch. Look it up on GOOGLE> ♥
He could be getting a bit desensitized to it. Nothing messes up your mood more than having bad blood sugars and you are dealing with a lot of other health issues. Hang in there. I have a ton of other things going on, too.
2000mg of met and I'm in the 200's I'm using Levemir insulin and get pretty good control with that. I would avoid Lantus if possible, terrible weight gain for me.
Best of luck! Hugs
A brisk walks always helps to lower by blood sugar and my stress!
If you're like me you got so angry about it because high bgs make some people really, really cranky. For me crankiness is often a symptom and, when I realize it, indicate it's time to check my bg. When you ask why you got so angry the answer may be as simple that, for you too, unexpected anger is a symptom. Are you mad at him or are you really mad at you? Neither seems very productive. When we stop to focus on anything other than the steps of our journey to where we want to go we are no longer moving forward. Instead of focusing on yesterday or someone else why not focus on what you can do right at this moment and later today?

Just my thoughts, only you know what is right for you.
Amy, have you been tested to ascertain whether you are Type 2, or are actually Type 1 (LADA). The fact that you have been managed for about 3 years on oral meds but now are dealing with rising numbers and also that you have thyroid issues makes me seriously question your diagnosis. You should see an endo and get antibody and c-peptide tests. You need to know your correct Type to get the right treatment.
Dear Amy,

This story is so familiar. In some version, I would guess it could be rewritten to fit many of us.

Insulin is nothing of which to be afraid. I resisted insulin for a very long time, and became more and more uncontrolled. Frankly, I was sick. I couldn't get better. My doctor gave me no choice. The choice was insulin or be sick, and get more sick. Shortly after starting insulin, I felt well. Trust me, it won't take long to feel better;mmm maybe a day. I am told that I am a totally different person now that I have insulin.

Like Ellie, I also use a pump. I began looking into a pump shortly after beginning insulin. I am so happy that I did. My GAD and c-peptide tests indicated some antibodies, so LADA is the verdict.

I have experienced several life changing events over the years. Insulin was one of them. The pump was another. The finger sticks hurt a heck of a lot more than the shots. Go for the insulin. You'll love it and so will those around you.

Be well.

Brian Wittman
Hi Amy: I agree with Brian, you may need insulin to control your BGs. And as Brian found out, he has slow-onset Type 1 diabetes/LADA. Have you been tested for Type 1 (antibody testing including GAD, ICA, and IA-2, plus c-peptide)? It is something to consider. Bottom line, the most important thing is to bring down your BGs (high BGs wreak havoc on emotions), and insulin will do that.
Well, I guess I just decided I owned my own diabetes. My wife is sympathetic and supportive, but at times she just doesn't care. She has expressed frustration that I won't eat stuff, I am always testing and injecting. I carry all this stuff around. I forget stuff and turn the car around and drive back. I have crises. And diabetes spills over into her life. When she married me, she didn't sign up for diabetes and and she is not an expert on diabetes. She doesn't know what test results mean, what medications I take, etc. But I am appreciative of the support she gives me.

For a while, I read the blog of the wife of a diabetic. I stopped reading the blog because I couldn't stand how she and her husband were behaving. She was trying to get him to take care of himself and he was non-compliant. I would have beat the cr*p out of him or left. You own your diabetes, you can pawn it off on someone else.

Your hyperthyroidism has probably made you edgy and probably left your blood sugar high. Your fiance may not be an expert at diabetes, but he is by your own words supportive. He may say that he thinks 248 fasting is "not too bad" and really only want to make you feel better. Don't be too fast to think he doesn't get it.

ps. And your blood sugars are high enough that it does make sense to try insulin to bring it down to normal. I am a T2 and I use insulin. I'd chose to use insulin and have normal blood sugars.
Not crazy is my vote.

Yes, your fiance doesn't get that 248 is not good, but on the other hand - what is he supposed to do with that information? Should he tell you you're a naughty and bad diabetic? Should he nag you to do better? Or should he say "oh, poor, poor you?" It's hard to be helpful if he doesn't know what to do about the information you're passing on or if he doesn't know that you're just sharing.

I'm not saying you're wrong to feel frustrated, but I think it's important for us to remember that our non-diabetic friends and family cannot always empathize even if they want to. We need to train them.

Thus I have 'trained' my pharmacist wife that when I complain about a high BG I'm not looking for advice or a cross-examination, I'm just venting and/or explaining my mood. She can ask what I think caused it or she can pat me on the shoulder and say "you'll take care of it." but that's about it.

So I encourage some patience and some education - "Honey, I want my BG to be in such and such a range. When it's higher than that I fell (fill in the blank) and when I tell you about it, it's because I want (fill in the blank)." Just a suggestion.


Terry

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