Good morning all - I am newly diagnosed T1 and am struggling to come up with good breakfast ideas. What are some of your favorites/standards? Thanks for sharing!

Tags: breakfast, carbs, diet, food, recipes

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Vegetable frittata, whey protein pancakes, flax seed waffles, strawberries with toasted nuts (nutola:-) and whole milk yogurt or sour cream, blueberry smoothie made with unsweetened almond milk (3g carbs per cup) A great source for low carb breakfast recipe ideas is http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/menus/a/breakfastmenus.htm
This is my standard breakfast. I have it every morning because it's predictable - 15 grams of carbs - and I find that 'as goes the morning BG, so goes the day's BG.' Well, usually. There is some variation allowed:

1. Two egg cheese omelette - using Egg Beaters or generic subsitute usually, but there's nothing wrong with real eggs.

2. Three to four slices of bacon.

3. 1/2 cup of fruit or one (1) slice of whole grain bread.

4. coffee with skim milk or just skim milk.

Substitutions:

a. Add some veggies to the omelette and skip No. 3.
b. Slather the toast with peanut butter and skip No. 2.

Good eating!

Terry
I eat a higher carb breakfast (high being about 45 grams of carb), but I eat an egg about 10 minutes beforehand and this keeps me from spiking afterwards. Eating a bunch of nuts instead of the egg works for me too.
Laura,

I noticed that I also tolerate a few more carbs sometimes if I eat an egg (or 2 or 3). I always eat my eggs first. Most of the time I will be normal about two hours later even if I sneak a single pancake with Cary's Sugar Free Syrup. I will have to try the nuts technique.

Does anyone else notice this?
I put some peanut butter in my oatmeal to help slow it down. It is a monster breakfast (1/2 cup oats, 1 banana, peanut butter, and milk) that I only eat right after a big workout. I also bolus 30-60 minutes in advance depending on where my BG is when I bolus. I've also found that it works best when I have a high basal rate going beforehand, regardless of the amount of bolus. This does not make a lot of sense to me. (Why wouldn't just taking a bigger bolus do the same thing?)
My 11 year old niece is not a big breakfast eater. Weekdays, one slice of raisin toast, Go-gurt, half cup milk. If she has time to eat more I throw in a half of banana or 3 ounces of grapes. Other days half english muffin, cheese stick and milk. Weekends, eggs, toast and milk. We found a 16 gram Sugar Free oatmeal, made in flavored packets, from A&P. That did not spike her. I have seen low fat frozen breakfast sandwiches, with eggs, turkey sausage, or breakfast burritos, the low fat kind would be good. Or you could make your own Egg McMuffin with egg, english muffin and ham or even bacon. I think it is very wise to avoid cereal. I have never found a cereal that doesn't raise her BS sky high, into the high 300s or 400. You may differ. But observe how you react to cereal in the morning. Pancakes.... She doesn't like them, fortunately. I would use French Toast with low carb syrup in lieu of pancakes. Again, you may differ. Good luck.

Whoa! All that carb would send me off the deep end. I guess kids have a higher metabolism? (I'm old.)

Omelettes are a good choice. Caramelize some onions, throw in some meat & cheese. You get lots of flavor and lots of protein, so you can have a small dose of carbs in the form of toast or hash browns/home fries. The protein should keep your BG from spiking.

I've got recipes that are a little long to post here, so I'll post links instead. Everything I cook finds its way into my journal.
Sweet & Smoky Omelettes w/ Smoked Kielbasa (with a picture here.)
Crispy Roasted Potatoes is a good, easy oven recipe for making home fries. Red potatoes are less starchy than others, so if you're going to have spuds that's your best bet. (Scroll down. It starts with a tilapia recipe.)
These all sound great. I will try one out today - thanks!
Sometimes its whole grain cereal of some sort or another with skim milk, fruit (sliced banana, strawberries, blueberries). Or I'll have a couple of pieces of whole grain toast with a bit of olive oil margarine and some swiss cheese and maybe a small yogurt. During the summer I enjoy a plate of fresh sliced fruits, some toast and maybe some cottage cheese. During the winter, I'll often have crock pot oatmeal (big family favorite!) mixed with some yogurt.

Recipe:

* One cup Steel-cut oats (or Irish oats). These are not like old fashioned or rolled oats.
* 4 cups water
* 1/2 cup half & half cream/milk
* 1 cup dried fruit. Sometimes I use chopped dried apricots or raisins and dried cranberries
* A shake or two of cinnamon

Spray your crockpot with Pam or other spray cooking oil. Add ingredients. Turn on "low" overnight, or for eight hours.

In the morning, give it a good stir and serve.

i also do the steel cut oats in the crockpot. i add some red river cereal as well (flax, rye and wheat). but i just cook the cereal with a piece of vanilla bean then freeze in 2/3 c. servings (the vanilla adds a touch of sweetness that is super yum). in the morning i add 1/2 an apple and some almonds and nuke it for 3 mins.
i found that even tho this has more carbs than some of my other breakfasts i have to take less insulin to cover it and i stay fuller for longer as well. not too sure why?

I literally eat nuts for breakfast. It's rather gross, really... I have 4 tablespoons sunflower seeds, 2 tablespoons almonds, and 2 tablespoons walnuts. All of this amounts to about 8 carbs. I don't spike, and I don't have hypoglycemia before lunch.

I also make a chocolate drink using 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder (1 carb), an egg, a pinch of salt, ginger powder, cinnamon powder, and a splash of milk. You whip together everything in a cup and then pour boiling water into it while stirring. The egg cooks and you get a low-carb, creamy, chocolaty drink! It's not sweet, but I like it. Another good food to help prevent spiking.

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