I have been using one touch products since I was dx in 2002. I was given a new Freestyle Lite and I tried it out right after the one touch. I noticed that the one touch was about 20mg/dl lower than the Freestyle. This morning I went to the endo and I tested with the one touch right before they tested me with their accucheck and again it was about 20mg/dl lower. Has anyone else had problems with lower readings from one touch meters?

Tags: glucose, meters

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I have used the one touch Ultra 2 for a while now but I have not tried another meter to test against so I can't say if I have run into the issue you are.
I bought a One Touch Ultra MIni to check my own bg, and then the dr gave me an Accucheck Aviva. The Aviva was clearly higher than the OTUM. I fussed about that, did some research and picked up another meter that is supposed to be highly accurate: the AgaMatrix Keynote. http://www.agamatrix.com/product_wave_1.shtml, if you look there is a chart comparing several meters. According to literature I found online, both the Keynote and the Aviva can parse thru some factors in your blood sample to give what is supposed to be a more accurate reading, and the Aviva and Keynote do tend to agree. I also have a Freestyle Flash ---yes, I got a little OCD carried away with meters when I first realized I had a blood glucose problem...;) --- the OTUM and the Flash do seem to go low, and the Aviva and Keynote seem higher compared to that. No comparison with a lab sample yet, so no comment on that.
The AgaMatrix is pretty new. I've been interested in getting that one myself. Is it readily available and are the strips readily available in most pharmacies now?

If you could post some links to the online literature you found explaining the AgaMatrix accuracy, that would be great. I've found a lot of articles that explain why home glucose monitors aren't as accurate as we might like, but i haven't found much which says which meters are better than others.
I called the customer service and they told me they have an agreement with Walgreens, so I may need to call ahead and "order" the keynote strips, but I can get them there. For now, I just order them online. You can also order direct from the company. They'd prefer you call a distributor, but they will sell them direct to you.

http://www.agamatrix.com/wavesense_accuracy.shtml
http://www.wavesense.info/how-it-works
http://www.wavesense.info/data

Yeah the meter accuracy thing is a huge PITA. How teh heck can I do "tight control" with an error margin of +/- 20 pts? That SUX! When I worked in a bank, an error of +/- 20 cents was a firable offense!
Most are not even 20 points difference, technically meters are only required to be accurate by 20% from actual lab draw. THAT's A HUGE DIFFERENCE! So if your BG at the lab is 240, your meter could range from 192-288, and be within acceptable limits.
Actually a discussion of the accuracy issue, as I understand it is this: The error is closer to +/- 20 points up to 120 and above that it's 20%. I'll try to find a link that explains it better.
Thanx Halle i'll have to give this agamatrix some thought. I already get me supplies from walgreens so that would be a bonus.
I had similar problems with 3 different Accucheck Avivas reading high. The first 2 were at my doctor's office. I had 5 different meters at home that were all calibrated against lab blood tests and they consistently disagreed with my doctor's 2 Avivas (the second one was obtained because I raised such a stink about the first one not being accurate). I eventually obtained an Aviva of my own and found that it too was consistently much higher than my other meters. When I had my brand new Aviva calibrated against a lab blood test it was 19% too high. I don't use Avivas any more, and I don't recommend them to anyone else.
I wish I could find it online but at our last pump support group we were discussing meters and in the Consumer Reports magazine they had an article comparing meters and the Aviva rated ninth in acuracy. One member had gone low during the night testing with the Aviva because it said he was safe but wasn't as high as he thought. I use the Freestyle and it seems extremely accurate and even weeds out certain medications that can cause false readings. I also love that I don't waste any strips because it won't start reading a result until there is sufficient blood on the strip.
Halle, thanks for your post:) can you give more info on how the Freestyle Flash compared w/ the AgaMatrix. I have a Presto but, only had 10 test strips to compare...and now I am using MM CGM. Would like to use the Presto full time...but, have 1 year of free test strips from Abbott (Freestyle flash)...I suspect the Presto would give me better numbers...any info you have on comparisons you have done would be appreciated:) PS: I know you post was from a LONG time ago...but, if you are still out there and have done some more comparisons...or...if someone else in the community has...please share. Thanks!
I learned this past Saturday morning, while at my Diabetes support group, that the various meters can differ by as much as 20 points. Our speaker, the owner of a diabetes supply business, indicated that the Free Style meters were considered to be the most accurate.
I've also read that the FreeStyle meters are considered the most accurate meters on the market. I don't remember their names but some of the most noted MD's in the field say the same thing.

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