Hi Everyone!

I am currently on the insulin pen and was wondering if I could use a CGM while on the pen or if you can only use it if you are an insulin pumper. I feel I would benefit from the use of a CGM. My doctor doesn't know much about the pump.

I hope someone will know the answer and can help me.
Thank you so much :)

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The data from CGMs is wierd but having a stream of data is awesome. You should be able to use it! Although, if you are sticking things into your abdomen anyway, I *really* like my pump a lot too!
You can use a CGM without being on a pump. In fact, I've often said that if I had to give up one techno thing (I currently use Omnipod pump and Dexcom CGM), I would give up the pump before the CGM. I absolutely love it and don't know how I functioned without it.

Linda
Yes, you can. I got a CGMS almost a year before going on the pump. I only used the pump for 8 months and went back to MDI. Anyone can benefit from a CGMS.
I am planning on going on the pump eventually, it's just that my insurance doesn't cover it but they do the pen, so I have to save up the money. I realize a CGM is expensive as well and I will be able to buy one with saved money just not both right now.

I know wanting a CGM and not being on the pump sounds ridiculous and I was embarrassed to even ask because I have never heard of anyone using the pen together with the CGM!

Thank you so much to everyone who responded, you guys were very helpful!
Take a look around the Dexcom group - there are a bunch of us MDIers! If you eventually want a pump, having the CGMS first will help you get your basals on the pump straight. It helps getting basals on MDI straight too!
Thank you, I will!
There is no reason why you should not use a CGM without a pump. They are on sale and look a bit like wrist watches. I wish I could afford them as I am very brittle and my glucose levels go up and down like a yo yo and I do not have hypo awareness, but they have to be bought personally.

I was shown one once at a conference but they are not overly accurate since they do not measure blood but bodily fluids just under the surface of the skin, but they are useful. I cannot remember what you do with the data or if you do anything at all, but I would love one!
Latvianchick, you are thinking of that Sleep Sentry thing - not sure if that was the right name or not. The Dexcom doesn't look like a wrist watch. There is a sensor that most people stick in their stomach (that is where Dexcom prefers but some people will use their upper arms). The receiver is not attached and you can stick it in your purse or leave it on your nightstand.

As far as accuracy, they have come a long way. Dexcom is not 100% accurate, but it is very accurate. If you have a sensor that is more than 20% off, they will replace the sensor - since test strips are allowed a 20% rate of error, I would say that is pretty good. Most times, mine is within 5 points. They also have arrows to show what direction your BS is moving in - that is extremely useful. If my BS is 65 with a straight across arrow, I would treat it differently than a 65 with 2 straight down arrows. There are also alarms to alert you when you go low or high - you pick what number you want for your target range.
Number ONE, I would get a new doctor.
Endocrinoligist is is what a M.D. who is a specialist in diabetes is known as.
You can give yourself enormous help by finding a new doctor who is a specialist in Diabetes.
These M.D.'s are known as Endocrinoligists.
Having just read the posts above - I totally agree with Jim - get a new doc. I live in london and pay for my own CGM (Navigator) - I have been on it for 3 years and life is great on the diabetes front. I have just started on the OmniPod - from pens - and although the first month was a bit trial and error - it works well. The only thing I would say is the positioning of the sensor and the pump !! Which side do you sleep on and do you snore !!

Gos

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