I really need good advice. For the past year I've felt really helpless in my situation and I'm losing hope that things will get better.

For the two years since my diagnosis, I've been sick constantly. I would say two weeks of every month. I have two little boys and I know that parents are more apt to get sick more often than folks who aren't exposed to bugs, but I get sick everytime one of my boys get sick and I get sick even when they're not sick.

Over the past year and I've had this weird thing happen where whenever i put even the slightest pressure on my arms or legs and let them fall asleep, I get extremely painfull pins and needles. It first started happening about 5 years ago, then once every few months. Now it happens everyday. I wake up in the middle of the night with sharp pain shooting down my hand because I felt asleep lying on it.

I thought that getting better bg control would be the answer to at least improve these problems (because in both cases the docs say it's in my head). So I got a One Touch Ping insulin pump in January. I saw the pump trainer a few times and followed up with her a few times. And the basal program seems to work, except for fasting numbers, but the bolus and correction factors don't work. I've been sick so often that I can't tell whether the program's off or my bgs are high because I'm fighting a cold. I also think my honeymoon ended this year.

I've tracked my diet, my exercise, my bgs, test 5 times a day every day, eat typically 30 grams of carb in a meal and my A1cs have been terrible. Before I went on the pump they were creeping up from lowest 6.3 to highest 6.7. My A1cs now were 8.9 and 7.3. I can't get my fasting below 8, most days it's 9-11. If I go to bed high, I stay consistent during the night. But if I go to bed low, I wake up really high.

I wrote to the pump trainer for advice and she told me to raise my bolus during the night. I did and my numbers only got worse.

I gave up the pump this week, but the numbers I used to use for needles aren't working either. When I saw my endo he gave me supreme s*** for my high A1cs and blamed it on the transition to the pump.

Where should I start? What should I do? I just want to get to the point of maintaining. Where I'm not trying to figure out what's wrong and why my health keeps getting worse despite my hard work.

What do you think I should do?

Tags: A1cs, basal, bolus, flu, high, pump, sickness

Views: 740

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Hi Kelly, I agree with everyone else. Testing more and doing some basal testing is very important to get the the pump adjusted to the right levels for you. Once you figure those out things are so much easier with a pump. I switched to a pump a year and a half ago and I honestly dont know what I ever did without it the 11 years before. If I were you I wouldnt give up on it, it is worth the hard work!
Maybe even consider finding an Endo or CDE that is easier to work with and wont talk down to you, that's not necessary or going to help! Most of us have had some rough spots in our management and it is so important to find someone that you are comfortable with and that wants to help you get in better control.
I am sorry you are going through all this. But it can get better! Don't loose hope!!!!!!
Hi Kelly

I notice you are in Calgary, I am too. Have you been to the Diabetes Education Centre (at the old Children's Hospital)? Both when I started on MDI and the pump, they were incredibly helpful in helping to get everything set up - basal rates, I:C ratios, etc. While I haven't been back to the centre in a while, I am thinking about getting my doctor to refer me back there as I am facing some new issues and would like to get better control. I have found them to be a very useful and supportive resource.
Thanks for all the support, advice and guidance. It sounds like I those of you who are in good control work hard to be there and I'm inspired by your dedication to keep trying.
Many of you said testing more is key, so that's definitely going to be a priority for me.

I called my pump trainer yesterday and set an appt to work with her this afternoon. I'm still not 100% sold on the pump, but I'm willing to give it a better try than I did.

Thanks and I'll keep you posted.
The trainer also told me other patients in my practice have switched endos, and I think this is an important thing for me to do. I don't think I can be as successful and I can be under his care.
I bet if you found an Endo more dedicated to helping you and that you were comfortable with would help so much. That made a huge difference for me! Wishing u all the luck with everything! U can do it!
I am glad you have decided to retry the pump! as a mom i know it is hard work maintaining everyone never mind yourself! I think maybe getting some extra help with the kids and allowing some down time for you would help your overall health. Your immune system needs some bolstering have you every thought of low level yoga some poses are great for immunity i could give you some tips if you are interested ( I am an instructor) , also probiotic supplements are great for bolstering immunity. I feel your pain and only hope the best for you, i hope you have enough suppport at home, we all support you here! amy
+ 1
Thanks for the offer. I would br very interested in some of your ideas.
FIRE THE MORON/CLOWN for giving you anything but h-e-l-p and/or deep compassion!


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This stuff is never easy...

You've done everything you can think of... have you considered the opposite approach, CUTTING BACK? Pushing too hard, tightening too much can cause bouncing, spiking solely because you pushed too much and caused a crash, and only discovered-caught the high by-product and never registered/discovered the low?

Any possibility?
LOL!! Another endork bites the dust!!
Hello Acidrock:

What is an endork please? never heard the term before...?
Surely it's selt-explanatory!? endocrinologist + bad advice= endork.

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