So I stumbled upon a brilliant way to wear insulin pumps with some dresses and skirts. I am sure some of you thought of this already, but if you haven't, it is seriously awesome.

This will only work if you have a pocket in your skirt or dress. I have found seam pockets to be the best, but i tried it on others and it works too.

Step 1: Get a seam ripper and a needle and thread.

Step 2: find the topmost part of the pocket's inner seam (if it is in the bottom of the pocket you risk things falling through).

Step 3: With the seam ripper, rip the part of the seam to have a small hole just large enough for the plastic part of the pump to slip through. Make sure that the hole you make goes all the way through so that it can connect to your site.

Step 4: Once you made the hole, do a simple loop stitch around it so that it doesn't continue to rip further (also, depending on the pocket, you might want to reinforce the seam.) (Also, I have actually skipped this step on a couple of pockets and they are fine because the seam itself is so well made that the hole doesn't get bigger--just use your judgement).

This honestly takes 5 minutes, and is so much EASIER (I actually swing dance and find this a much easier way to keep my pump available when wearing a dress, although I have plans to add snaps to these pockets to keep the pump extra safe when I dance).

Additional bonus: this keeps the pump cord away from the elements. I'm debating doing this to some of my looser pants also.

So, who else has good ideas for clothes and pumps?

Tags: clothes, cord, dress, pump

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Okay, and here is a photo of what the pocket looks like when the dress is inside out. My index finger shows you where the hole that the pump cord goes through is located.

Attachments:

yes I've done this myself. also if you are a sewer, you can add a pocket to a side seam pretty easily, or even ask an alterations place to do it for you.

My big problem is that more and clothes do not have pockets at all. If I am buying dress pants, my selection is greatly reduced by the request that the pants have to have pockets. I haven't seen a pocket in a skirt in awhile. Dresses, yes, but I think the idea is that you will wear a jacket or sweater with a skirt and it will have pockets.

My wife did this to one of my work shirt pockets. It was a little more involved since it require a slit to be cut and then a large button hole sewn in. I find that my work shirt pocket is an excellent place for my pump, it has a flap to keep it in place and it's up away from the abuse it would get when clipped to my belt.

I haven't ask her to do the rest because I have been just stringing the tube out of the pocket and into my shirt above a button. There is only about 1 inch of tube showing that is hardly noticeable and besides I'm not trying to hide it anyway. This way I can remove my shirt without disconnecting.

@Spock: That's funny, most of my skirts actually have pockets and none of my sweaters do (and it's usually too warm where I live to wear jackets regularly). I guess it just depends where you shop, but having a top with a pocket for the pump is a good idea.

There are some stores on etsy where you can buy garters for pumps, but they never want to stay up.

Another thing I have done with dresses with no pockets (and too form fitting to add pockets to) is find a matching small purse and put the pump in there. If I were more clever at sewing I might even find a way to sew it to the dress so that it doesn't swing about or look awkward.

Maybe there is a way to have a pin that one could place on an appropriate part of the dress that is sturdy enough?

I am struggling with a bridesmaid dress I am going to need to wear come June. It is form fitting and the pump just bulges out...Not quite sure what to do.

KML, you could wear your pump on your leg.

When i was married over two decades ago lol,I put my pump in my left suspender.

I've taken a bandeau bra, that is too small to wear as a bra. I wear it around my waist and tuck the pump in there. I have worn strapless knit dresses that are fairly form fitting and it works well. UIt does mean going to a restroom to bolus, but a little inconvenience is okay.

Baby socks! Pumps fit perfectly in a baby sock, and they can be discreetly safety-pinned to the inside seam/waistband of almost anything. I've also used Vetrap (stretchy, self-adhesive wrap) to attach my pump to my lower leg. The only issue with it is that you really can't access the pump, so if you don't have a remote it probably wouldn't work.

Thanks for the tips.

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