And allows her to consume massive quantities of junk food. Perhaps this says more about the food available in hospitals however the story doesn't give me warm fuzzies? Also noting the vast amount of stuff plugged into Erin's abdomen which is quite a bit smaller than mine?

I suppose some of the gizmos are "scientific" as opposed to "operational" in nature and it seems like the scientists involved are optimistic however I am doing ok w/ the 2 things currently plugged into my abdomen and am not sure 6 things at whatever as yet to be announced cause is a huge improvement? I can sort of perceive that perhaps there's other things that could be done for patients, e.g. self-treating the hypo, rather than going to the office and calling mom for a hypo? That seems cumbersome however perhaps that's part of the school bureaucracy that would be able to be changed? Schools are squidgy these days. I can't imagine having to deal with one.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/04/health/artificial-pancreas/index.html...

I won't paste the whole article here however the # of things and the problems with the school seem to leap out at me. There's probably other things too however I don't want to be too cranky without more medical inforamation about how well the gizmo processes bacon cheeseburgers.

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> p.s. Did anyone else feel like saying, "big deal" when Elizabeth Cohen
> said how Elle was testing 10-12 times a day and sometimes had
> lows and had to give herself insulin?

My two cents: I think it's a valid window into how someone who is not a PWD (person with diabetes) may view things. A lot of focus on some discrete tasks, like shots and bg tests, without a good broader view.

Yep. I always feel like laughing now -- and not a very nice laugh -- when people say (in that Minnie-Mouse horrified sympathy voice), "Oh, I don't see how you can stick yourself with a needle!"

I just think, "Honey, you have no idea how minor a needle poke is in the grand scheme of things that completely suck about having diabetes!!!"

I try to remind myself that people simply don't know what they don't know -- and there are millions of things that I don't know. It's good to hold on to humility about it; otherwise, resentment can creep in.

Very true about how insignificant needle pokes are, but when speaking to a non-D, you sometimes need to speak in a language they understand. And it is hard to understand that some people will never know what a 300 BG feels like, or how tough carb counting is, or how - even when you do everything right - things sometimes go horribly wrong.

I'm not sure if, by resentment, you mean resenting diabetes or resenting other peoples' inability to "get it", but as people with diabetes we've got to fight the tendency to do both.

I was referring to resenting people who don't get it -- resenting diabetes is kind of a given, isn't it? Ha!

I do about five minutes of Type Zero education per week and call it good. Most of them just don't want to know -- it's just way too much information -- and I see no useful purpose in burdening them with fun facts about neuropathy, gastroparesis, retinopathy, DKA, etc. etc. etc.

As long as I have my fellow diabetes warriors to chat with and everyone near me knows to dial 911 if I fall down, I'm good.

I showed my new diabetic alert bracelet to my guitar teacher and I could see in his face that it made him sick with worry. Something you and I take for granted as just part of the territory was very distressing to him. Why needlessly burden them or shatter their innocence? I don't want him lying awake at night feeling sad about my blurry vision or endangered fingers. He's a sensitive soul and as far as I'm concerned, the less he knows about my diabetes the better.

I'd much rather he and I spent our time together talking about augmented 5ths, tremolos and the dotted eighth notes common in French Baroque compositions for the lute.

I did not know you were a "Trekkie" like me, Alan.. One of my favorite episodes lol..

Mister Mudd is wearing that <>. Now it appears he got that blouse from My closet and the earrings from my jewelry box.. but he was "poppin" the look, circa 1969-70? lol

God bless,
Brunetta

Ps. What is the actor's name, Alan.

Brunetta, threads getting a little tangled, hope this winds up near your question. The actor was Roger Charles Carmel

Maybe we need to start a Trekkie group????? :-) I have the complete set of the original Star Trek, and watched the complete Next Generation, too. Those were the days! :-)

My brother is the ultimate Next Generation fan. He has all of the Next Generation episodes, and most of the originals. I watch them with him when I go to Ga.

For Laughs, check out George Takei's (Sulu)Facebook Wall. He has Star Trek related posts and photos that are hilarious.would post a couple if I knew how.

God Bless,Brunetta

I should have saved my husband's tapes of every original Star Trek episode to give to one of you Trekkies. Yes, he taped every one.

Sounded like a good idea, so I thought I'd try. It doesn't have to be all about Star Trek, just for people who enjoy the same thing to get together.

http://www.tudiabetes.org/groups/583967:Group:2598044?xg_source=msg...

I'm a "Trekkie" too. Also love the older Dr. Who's with Tom Baker,cheesy special effects and all.

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