I have had a horrible experience with the dexcom seven and I feel the company could care less. I never really felt the system worked. I had sensor failing problems and constant calibration problems from the very first session. My calls to customer service were brushed off and the onus was always put back on me - send us your data; calibrate more often; don't sleep on your stomach. I used the system only a few times because it was so much of a hassle and the benefits were next to none as the system was horribly inaccurate. Jump ahead six months and I find myself preggo (only lasted a few weeks :( ). So I get back on the system with as much aggravation as ever. At the Dr.'s office I complain about the dexcom and he is surprised that I have so many complaints. We try to download the info and it doesn't work. Oh, and I should mention that this is all out of pocket for me - $400 receiver, $60 sensors and $.67 test strips. He urges me to call and try to get a new one. I play by all the rules and do all of the suggestions and still no resolutions. My Dr. lends me one from his office and it actually works! I was amazed - I really just thought dexcom had bribed to FDA to get approval. I give my system one last shot and it is a total and utter mess. I get tough with dexcom and they brush me off with a "sorry you are out of warranty." I am so frustrated!!! How do they expect to make money? I would have happily shelled out $3000+ per year for a functioning system. I don't really understand how not replacing my nonfunctioning receiver can make any business sense.
I would love to hear if anyone has had any luck with getting something done at dexcom. One of the reasons I am out of warranty is because they gave me the run around for months and my warranty expired during this time. If anyone has any suggestions I am all ears.

Tags: dexcom

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Rickst29:

Thank you for your comments, counsel, and thoughts.

Regarding sensor startup. I had not seen the recommendation you made or traffic on tudiabetes but then again
I tried to read the postings as best I could. Thank you - I will try that.

My apologies for disturbing you happy campers.
Our "search" tool (upper right corner of every web page) is extremely weak and difficult to use effectively. You're basically limited to keywords and the selection of a forum area- you can't select particular users, or particular date ranges to include in the search.

Even I will have a slow time, slogging through search hits to find these posts and threads. And so, can I please leave you with only that information?

Plus just one more thing on this: To protect the injection area from infection, and to protect the plastic plate with electrical contacts from accidental bending, cover it with something. Sandwich bag plastic won't stick to the contact plate, or leave glue behind. So, a small area of that first, and then tape it in place from above.

You've made no "horrible" disturbance as far as I'm concerned. I just wanted to help you make your complaints more effective in assisting improvement -- rather than killing the company. In previous lives, I've worked in government bureaucracies. I've also worked in T&I, CS, and other roles in a few computer firms.
Rickst29:

WIth my right eye being out due to stroke and having to use a prism on right eye; I find myself easily missing data on web due to poorbinoccular eye tracking and scanning.

In response to your "discussion points" you made; I have the following comments and questions:

1. WHere is the discussion/blog about a 3 hour startup in addition to the 2 hour. Please write back and point for us older slugs doing our best to track.
2. So far both units show temperature overheating and the fisrt one kept chilled is doing job 24/7. Outside in cold air no issue.
3. Working unit works best when in quiet RF environment and not my condo. Driving 40 miles across outskirts of LA suburbs shows no problem.
4. Dexcom has been fully advised by me and my legal representative.
5. Any comments I made about response were tracked and charted and checked for repeat response and was found in mornings. Later in day unit tracked same speed waveforms without incident.
6. Nobody especially me has ever said or requested that finger sticks should be eliminated. I have always been most clear about that and my comments come back to the issue that I should spend over $ 1000 per month - 675 for mail order $ 27 a barrel for 15 barrels of strips per month and $ 300+ for sensors. Unless there is some trick I am unaware of ; I get 10 days repeatedly on sensors - not two weeks.
My hope was that I could get away with 6 to 8 fingetsticks a day - which gets me back to 4 barrels - $ 130 - reasonable.
For some reason I need to take 2 readings - one each hand and average due to large spread. My stroke cut off my temp sense on left side of body and it is always cooking hot when sugar up. Even following cleaning instructions and all proper proceure I get double and high readings for reasons escape me so that every reading is not perfect. 30 per cent leakage.
Regarding sensor confusion and test strips, be thankful that Dexcom's sensors do apply chemical filter to block other sugars in blood stream - not human glucose.
I cannot use a PQQ-GDH test strips and handhelds as my body when digesting out food dumps out the corn and trick sugars that boot that technology routinely 25 to 200 points off track - no sweat. Not an issue - I disagree.

Regarding FDA - I disagree with your comments. My sense is that :

1. FDA has political masters that change at whim of voters.
2. My sense is FDA is trying at its best to do solomnesque decision without splitting child in half.
3. At its worst FDA is trying to minimize pain its end.
4. In America and its legal/political system; lobbying has become fine art and ends up skewing necessary
decisions that have to be made..
5. Try and help all us great unwashed with a rational decision after above comments

As indicated; when it works, I really like it and it is critically helpful. When it misbehaves due to code and design shortcommings, it burns my money up unneccessarily and waylays me in managing my diabetes.

in a previous post, I asked the writer - what economics ? I never got answer.
Once again - thank you for commenting.
By economics I was simply referring to this: When manufacturing a competitive product, success largely depends on having the best quality product and selling this product at a fair price.
When sales are unsatisfactory it is these two issues which must be addressed.

Management appreciates intelligent customer feed-back which includes suggestions for improvement far more than whining which same management finds useless.

I find the day I change my sensor the readings are way off, with exceptions occasionally. I don't like this but accept it until a CGM arrives with this condition eliminated. Then I'll get the best quality product.
There certainly are some positive aspects regarding the CGM but at the moment I'm not sure if they can be mentioned on this site
Very sorry you had a stroke jims.
Jim
Jim Devlin:

Excellent comments - thank you.

On this comment:

"Management appreciates intelligent customer feed-back which includes suggestions for improvement far more than whining which same management finds useless."

I am unclear how one arrives at that though.

In my past I worked DEC field service on their PDP11/45/70 Vax series and was amazed many times how a user had a complaint or problem described as best he could in the parlence /lingo of his field/expertise that many times was diisconnected/missed the world I worked in. Yet if one suspended judgement long enough and attempted to understand what was driving user nuts, many times many serious hardware/software faults would emerge and everybody was far less phsycologically exercised in the process. After the resolution that usually concluded much faster, the user usually was much happier and more impressed with my old company as a result.

On another case of a pharmacy another company I worked for in past were installing early on line pharmacy control; we were having a terrible time on some of the hardware - software; the owner shared with me that he realized not all problems or concerns can be easily fixed or resolved as long as the candidate company was doing their best to help. He could overlook a lot of it and do his best to live with it.

Pearl Harbor was missed even though early radar picked up Yamamoto's airplane boggies in bound
due to pre-assessed assumed conclusion on the data and its value.

Thank you most kindly for your time, sympathy and comments. Best wishes and good luck with your diabetes as well. None of it is helpfull and always ready to keep changing the circumstances.
I'm sorry to hear of your vision problem, and sincerely hope that it's temporary.

Thanks for numbering questions and comment items in this post, it makes my reply much easier to construct. In order:

#1 Per my new reply (a minute ago) to the previous 'parent' post, I'd like to skip this. I THINK that my creation of such a listing (Threads and posts regarding "shoot in with extra time before startup") would be very time consuming, and provides no further benefit for your actual use.

#2. Understood, although I'm not sure why you've had two such units, and I've not had such a problem (with four Receivers, going back to the original STS). I wonder if the various Dexcom Receiver "Generations" contain identical hardware, differing only in ROM microcode? Interesting question, although I've never torn up even a single one of them.

#3: inside your home, you might be getting interference from other 2.4 Ghz sources. Check especially for 802.11b/g/n networks with strong signals in the area where you're having problems. (802.11n devices are often using the same frequency band as the "old" stuff did.) Even if you don't have any, you might be getting substantial interference from neighbors.

#4 and #5: Good job!

#6: I understand the financial pain, but have no suggestion or comment on your costs (other than OUCH!!!). The rest of this section, though, brings up issues of great "curiosity". Now remember that I am NOT licensed to practice Medicine, or to act as a Nurse, in any role, in any State! And I'm not a CDE either! The following comments are TOTALLY UNQUALIFIED, they're nothing more than wild-ass guesses.

From my amateur understanding of the human body, a large differential in blood glucose (from fingers on one hand versus fingers on the other) indicates problems in either testing procedure (not a medical issue); or some kind of circulatory problem along the blood path to and from the low-reading hand. YIKES!

However, I'd suspect the meter, battery, and strips first. How many meters do you have for testing against each other, with blood from the SAME poke, drawn from a big drop in just a couple of seconds? BTW, what kind of strips and meter are you using? I use One-Touch ultra. It's got a wide range of testing temperatures, works well at high altitudes, and it's Glucose Oxidase. Strips are costly, though.

PQQ test strips may certainly be an issue for you, but they are NOT! an issue for the Dexcom CGMS.

Now, I will give my "further impressions" of the FDA approval process, responding to your numbered items:

#1. I think that a remarkable thing about the FDA is that it's theoretical "masters" have great difficulties in creating change in these lower-level processes. That's partly because the bosses (Secretary Sebelius, Preesident Obama, and Congress) are still entangled in other huge efforts - i.e., defending or attacking Health Care Reform. But an even bigger part is the fact that the Approvals are in the hands of long-entrenched civil servants, who also have weighty documentation of expertise to support their tendency to tell politicians and high-level administrators to "butt out, and leave it to the experts-- unless you can show me an stack of graduate degrees and licenses which qualify YOU as an expert."

#2. You're going all poetic and Biblical, I don't know what you're trying to say with this one.

#3. I think this notion is RIGHT ON THE MONEY. As I discussed previously, FDA would MUCH rather let people continue suffering with current (less effective) treatments, than take even a small risk of "yet another" erroneous Approval of a bad treatment. When Politicians can point at Approvals like Avandia, the power of FDA's Approval people to work without politicial interference is badly compromised. The organization defends itself first; it serves the Public second.

#4. This may be true, but it's not extremely relevant to FDA drug and device approvals -- because politicians are not in charge. Until a bad decision is made, that is.... and that's why FDA Approvals require massive amounts of documentation, typically generated at enormous expense.

Dexcom has made it's situation even worse, I think, by making the FDA's previous approvals look "bad", per the broken wire problem.
- - - - -

Now, I have a hard question for you: Since your body is so messed up that you can't even trust your two hands to agree with each other on fingerstick tests, WHY ON EARTH are you expecting slower, less accurate subcutaneous technology to do well?

I'm not an "approved" expert, but my amateur, layman's opinion is simply that you are not a good candidate for this technology.

I'm really, REALLY sorry that your health history and current issues are so severe. Do those high non-glucose sugar levels imply some level of liver damage as well? I'm not an expert, but it's a question which I'd look into if I experienced your post-meal non-glucose "leakage".

Maybe you should go low-carb? ASK YOUR ENDO FIRST, because that could stress your liver in ways it can't handle anymore. But high non-Glucose sugar levels in blood are possibly damaging in ways similar to Glucose; from what I've read, they SHOULD BE rapidly largely sucked in by your liver and converted to Glucose for current use, or Glycogen for later use. If not low carb, then a "continuous grazing" diet?

But really- if you can't get reliable, repeatable results from Glucose Oxidase test strips from your two hands, then the reliability and repeatability of your ISF measurements is probably unacceptable as well.
Rickst29:

Holy hannah, look what I set loose. My humble apologies but response is deserved :

Vision - thank you for support and kind comments. This occurred in Dec 2007. Everyone kept telling me that would heal. A year later my doc had me do another MRI. Response - some smart ass must have sent the first MRI from 2007 by mistake. Nope, no healing in stroke zone. now 2011 and still need prisim in glasses to correct right eye issues due to stroke.

Reply by Rickst29 4 hours ago
I'm sorry to hear of your vision problem, and sincerely hope that it's temporary.

Thanks for numbering questions and comment items in this post, it makes my reply much easier to construct. In order:

#1 Per my new reply (a minute ago) to the previous 'parent' post, I'd like to skip this. I THINK that my creation of such a listing (Threads and posts regarding "shoot in with extra time before startup") would be very time consuming, and provides no further benefit for your actual use.

#2. Understood, although I'm not sure why you've had two such units, and I've not had such a problem (with four Receivers, going back to the original STS). I wonder if the various Dexcom Receiver "Generations" contain identical hardware, differing only in ROM microcode? Interesting question, although I've never torn up even a single one of them.
Simple first unit had heating issues and I asked for swap out. They conceeded to do but before they did - they said what do we do if that does not work? Most Curious.

#3: inside your home, you might be getting interference from other 2.4 Ghz sources. Check especially for 802.11b/g/n networks with strong signals in the area where you're having problems. (802.11n devices are often using the same frequency band as the "old" stuff did.) Even if you don't have any, you might be getting substantial interference from neighbors.
Yes and I pulled my securitycamera and link and shutdown. Fios router wireless antenna removed and shutdown. I have evidence of some strong interferor in here when I first found interference on my security camera link that was most nasty.
I have been tempted to get the good lad who used to manage and do my FCC approvals to bring his spectrum analyzer and field antenna to see who is making this mess..

#4 and #5: Good job!

#6: I understand the financial pain, but have no suggestion or comment on your costs (other than OUCH!!!). The rest of this section, though, brings up issues of great "curiosity". Now remember that I am NOT licensed to practice Medicine, or to act as a Nurse, in any role, in any State! And I'm not a CDE either! The following comments are TOTALLY UNQUALIFIED, they're nothing more than wild-ass guesses. No problem - you are member of great unwashed like myself on this stuff and electronics does not qualify one to piddle in medicine.

From my amateur understanding of the human body, a large differential in blood glucose (from fingers on one hand versus fingers on the other) indicates problems in either testing procedure (not a medical issue); or some kind of circulatory problem along the blood path to and from the low-reading hand. YIKES! not so fast ; I am large person and I find that if I walk hard then both hands do in fact track.

However, I'd suspect the meter, battery, and strips first. How many meters do you have for testing against each other, with blood from the SAME poke, drawn from a big drop in just a couple of seconds? BTW, what kind of strips and meter are you using? I use One-Touch ultra. It's got a wide range of testing temperatures, works well at high altitudes, and it's Glucose Oxidase. Strips are costly, though.
I am using only the free style light with the new FAD-GDH strips that have proven the most consistent and track very favourably with dexcom. In fact whne doing one reading from each hand and averaging; that tracks well. See report from Kobe University on this technology that is oxygen insensitive and targets human glucose only.
One touch - I need to drink a gallon of water each time I go to test - 2 x readings no sweat.

PQQ test strips may certainly be an issue for you, but they are NOT! an issue for the Dexcom CGMS. no comment.

Now, I will give my "further impressions" of the FDA approval process, responding to your numbered items:

#1. I think that a remarkable thing about the FDA is that it's theoretical "masters" have great difficulties in creating change in these lower-level processes. That's partly because the bosses (Secretary Sebelius, Preesident Obama, and Congress) are still entangled in other huge efforts - i.e., defending or attacking Health Care Reform. But an even bigger part is the fact that the Approvals are in the hands of long-entrenched civil servants, who also have weighty documentation of expertise to support their tendency to tell politicians and high-level administrators to "butt out, and leave it to the experts-- unless you can show me an stack of graduate degrees and licenses which qualify YOU as an expert."

#2. You're going all poetic and Biblical, I don't know what you're trying to say with this one.

#3. I think this notion is RIGHT ON THE MONEY. As I discussed previously, FDA would MUCH rather let people continue suffering with current (less effective) treatments, than take even a small risk of "yet another" erroneous Approval of a bad treatment. When Politicians can point at Approvals like Avandia, the power of FDA's Approval people to work without politicial interference is badly compromised. The organization defends itself first; it serves the Public second.

#4. This may be true, but it's not extremely relevant to FDA drug and device approvals -- because politicians are not in charge. Until a bad decision is made, that is.... and that's why FDA Approvals require massive amounts of documentation, typically generated at enormous expense.

Dexcom has made it's situation even worse, I think, by making the FDA's previous approvals look "bad", per the broken wire problem.
- - - - -

Now, I have a hard question for you: Since your body is so messed up that you can't even trust your two hands to agree with each other on fingerstick tests, WHY ON EARTH are you expecting slower, less accurate subcutaneous technology to do well?

I'm not an "approved" expert, but my amateur, layman's opinion is simply that you are not a good candidate for this technology.

I'm really, REALLY sorry that your health history and current issues are so severe. Do those high non-glucose sugar levels imply some level of liver damage as well? I'm not an expert, but it's a question which I'd look into if I experienced your post-meal non-glucose "leakage".
Interesting thought which I have done some exploratory on and no success.

Maybe you should go low-carb? ASK YOUR ENDO FIRST, because that could stress your liver in ways it can't handle anymore. But high non-Glucose sugar levels in blood are possibly damaging in ways similar to Glucose; from what I've read, they SHOULD BE rapidly largely sucked in by your liver and converted to Glucose for current use, or Glycogen for later use. If not low carb, then a "continuous grazing" diet?
Well before I got rid of dawn effect and got liver dumps during day stopped, I had kidney issues., eye hemorages and other issues that after 6 months after stopping that, kidneys stabalized. eye hemorages cleaned up by camera pictures from two different sources and then A1c test dropped to 6.9. So I hear you but not sure.

But really- if you can't get reliable, repeatable results from Glucose Oxidase test strips from your two hands, then the reliability and repeatability of your ISF measurements is probably unacceptable as well.

I do get reliable results from the FAD-GDH strip technology that tracks the Dexcom when the overheating and rf link issues are not distracting DEXCOM.
Amazking - what an educational response.

It startes easy - i am here to help.
It asks some good questions.
It attempts to fake - I am oinly a little country boy asking some wild ass guesses.
It then launches into a full personnal attack on data I graciously presented to help.
It completes with a full tirade against FDA and attempting to draw me into this mess to bad mouth our politicians, FDA and others.

I wonder what type of person is this and the apparent safety to make such nasty attacks without any recrimmination or questions why he is doing this - than other to engage Jim s in inappropriate discussion and comments on our political people, FDA, lawyers, Dexcom et all..

That's disgracefull. The attack in the end has all the drama, force and attack of a Roman Legionaire doing a short sword pig stabber attack on the outsiders.

I am highly disappointed in this on a web site for diabetics.
Didn't mean to ruin your day.
Why don't you open your own blog like many others with way too much to say have done.
In the meantime, see how much you can say in 200 words or less. This, my friend, would be far more interesting and educational.
It's not the fault of the site. The "fault" of any hard-nosed, overly emphatic speculation in my posts is MINE ALONE.

PM if you're interested to discuss further; I'm sorry if my opinions have been expressed in disgraceful ways, or are inherently disgraceful. I do have strong opinions, and many of them might indeed be wrong.
My health is not the issue here unless you are attempting to put me down as being too sick to use
a tool like this nor am I to respond to a users site as a valid Dexcom User.

I find the comments here agressive and unfortunate.

I was simply trying to respond to concerns I have but have concluded that my input is not wanted; not acceptable and I should go away.

After cleaning up my health as documented by many external labe test over 4 years, multiple visits to Kidney Doctor, Allergy doctor and neurologist and diabetes Doctor; I take the attack on FDA as insulting, inflammatory and even if true unhelpful. I did not feel that a bunch of questions and editorial comment on my health helped explain anything.

Finally; people like me are two sick to use Dexcom gear; judging by comments. What is your relationship to Dexcom.
Again, my opinions are purely amateur. And of course, we've never met in person, and I've not seen any of your PMI. I absolutely DO NOT! mean to "put you down" in any way! But you are aware, I'm sure, that medical conditions often have many alternative treatments, with different costs and benefits-

I was simply wondering if the costs versus benefit of Dexcom use really make it a good choice for you. Only you can say- but you say that it's been VERY inaccurate, causing enormous frustration.

My speculation that circulatory system issues might be involved should not have been written with "why on earth..." and exclamation marks, I apologize! I wanted to bring up a possible reason why the technology might NOT be effective workable for you. But I loaded my words with nasty "baggage".

My error, NOT yours! I'm truly sorry to have written my previous entry so badly.

I have absolutely no relationship to Dexcom, except as a Pt. (I've never been in a study; I don't own stock; I've never asked a question during a conference call; nothing.)

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