There are many stories here and elsewhere of those who have "given-up", quite literally people who quit being diabetics or even acknowledging they have diabetes at all.

Teens, 20 something's, beginners and experienced folks alike.

 

They don't care about insulin coverage, picking random numbers out of thin air...

Eat anything and everything and do not cover for it...

People who go for days without ever taking insulin at all,

People who test not at all or very rarely despite taking injectable insulin

All kinds of examples...

 

 

It is a slow and painful process what I call dia-cide; in effect passive "suicide" by diabetes.

 

My question, how would you reach someone in that kind of bad head space?

 

If you were watching a fellow diabetic spiral into a certain "crash and burn" mode,

Your child, your partner, someone that you cared about, a young person you knew/heard of...

how would you "talk them down" so to speak...

 

Anyone have ideas how to do that?

 I'm betting there might be a few

 

Thoughts -wg-...?

 

 

Stuart

Tags: bad, denial, dia-cide, diabetes, head, health, mental, psychiatry, psychology, quit, More…reject, space, suicide

Views: 5581

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

What a tough situation/question to analyze. I like to think that folks who care about themselves are those with a good self-image; they find value in judicious self-care regardless of whether that care includes a chronic disease. Which makes me think that someone who is not taking care is burdened -- not by the illness but something entirely unrelated, something that deeply affects their sense of self-worth.

I was in exactly that head space until June of this year, but recall thinking that if I gave up entirely it meant letting the b*st*rds win. And I decided I just couldn't let that happen.
Hello Muragaki:

Thank you for taking part.

Do you think there are ways to give others that belief, who have "quit"? Any way to challenge or suggest it so it might stick?

Stuart
I just got through begging my sister to test herself......she was over a course of months complaining about one thing or another and it all sounded like diabetes. I asked when she last tested or took her meds? She shined me on....so about 3 weeks ago I begged her to please get a A1C, since there OTC now. She went home BG tested herself and she was at 400. I didn't have to say much more after that, her BG said it all.
Hello CaKats:

Thank you for taking part as well!

A question if I may... how does one plead effectively? When I hear the same words repeatedly diabetes related or not, it looses any effect. Well meaning, if the method offends or is in any way intrusive, under the best cicumstances I ignore them... under the worst, there is massive "bloodletting" (and it ain't mine)...

Any ideas how one can be effective with the pleading approach?
Stuart
About twenty years ago an older relative with diabetes (2nd cousin twice removed or something) used to hide candy bars all over her apartment. She lived alone and her son would come over everyday to search. Best one I remember: in the glass shade of a ceiling lamp. He saw its shadow when he turned the light on one night. He and his wife begged and pleaded with her, to no avail. She lost a leg and eventually died. This was beyond giving up; this was a woman on self-destruct.

A diabetes educator told me I had dia-burnout. I guess my eyes glazed over after hearing about checking my feet for the 450th time. I have never not taken insulin, but I certainly have not taken care of myself for long periods of time. Friends cautioning me just made me crankier.
The one comment that jolted me: What do you love more: your partner or a donut? That got me. I realized that each time I chose to eat a donut, I was choosing less time with, and more heartache for, the ones I love. It's not just about me and my health.
Alice,
The one comment that jolted me: What do you love more: your partner or a doughnut? That got me. I realized that each time I chose to eat a doughnut, I was choosing less time with, and more heartache for, the ones I love. It's not just about me and my health.

You just gave me a "Aha moment" as corny as that sounds. Thank You!
My mother has done the T2 thing for 25 years, and I have basically managed her.
These were the milestones or else (wakeup calls along the way).

1. Control yourself in the first 10 years. The rest of your life will depend on what you did in those first 10 years.
2. With diabetes, you just get what diseases you would have got anyway. Diabetes just brings them earlier (heart, kidney,e ye disease etc).
3. If you want to see your grandkids grow up, manage your blood glucose.
4. Watch portion size
5. watch what you eat.
6. Exercise a little.

She is doing fine 25 years later!!
Why am I on this bandwagon?

I studied at University, bit by bit the human body, what diabetes does to each part.
So when my mother was diagnosed it hit me.
Everyday, a little elevated blood sugar, will cause all those diabetes effects!!


To recap:

1. Control yourself in the first 10 years. The rest of your life will depend on what you did in those first 10 years.
2. With diabetes, you just get what diseases you would have got anyway. Diabetes just brings them earlier (heart, kidney,e ye disease etc).
3. If you want to see your grandkids grow up, manage your blood glucose.
4. Watch portion size
5. watch what you eat.
6. Exercise a little.

Its hard, but so is life.
On the upside, there's so much that is good, fun and great to live a long healthy life.
Enjoy !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Hello Michael:

Appreciate your comments, thoughts, thank you.

If we screw-up well enough, in the "right now", neither the past or any future matters at all. The right now can kill.

If in spite of the BEST and text book zealous efforts, what happens if the complications occur anyway? What then?

Stuart
I am in burnout right now. Have been for the past six months or so. (Hence my last A1c of 8.5 ... one before that was 7.1, and before that 6.6).

I'm WAY better than I was about two months ago and hence my next A1c should be back in the low 7s, but I'm still not exercising at all and not eating all that well, both of which I have to do if I want to hit the high 6s (haven't been able to get any lower than that). I have started actually counting carbs properly again, though ...

That quote really made me stop and think. I'm going to repeat it whenever I want to eat crap or am too lazy to exercise. Thank you!
Thanks Jennifer.
I'm glad you embraced (and not 'shoot') the messenger.

Good luck.
Hello Jennifer:

Thank you for participating...

Glad to hear things are improving. The only problem with A1C gold standard is that it is an average.

Meaning I could well have text book perfect readings to get an ideal A1C, or I could have a hell of a lot of lows, and highs to get said number. It is a flaw of that method. Nothing wrong with eating crap or not exercising, simply cant make them habits ; )

Stuart
Hello Alice:

Thank you for your thoughts.

Can this "self destuct" be self preservation on some level do you think?

We cannot test its....emotionally too hard, too frustrating, too self injurious... take your pick so we stop for a some brief time. Is that the same or different IYO?

Stuart

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

DHF receives $200,000 grant from Novo Nordisk

Grant given to support programs aimed at bringing together people touched by diabetes for positive change BERKELEY, CA: December 4, 2014 – Diabetes Hands Foundation (DHF) has received a grant of US$200,000 from Novo Nordisk to support programs aimed at Read on! →

Guest Post: World Diabetes Day 2014 on Twitter… sifting through the data

At Symplur we track hashtags, keywords, user accounts, and pretty much anything else on Twitter that has to do with healthcare. We collect the data and then build countless ways to slice it up so that we’re able to better Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service