I'm wondering if T2 diabetics feel like people think it's their fault they got the disease? Is there more "sympathy" for people with T1? I am a type 2 (fairly) newly diagnosed, and sometimes I do feel like people around me think I gave it to myself. I DON'T think the people on this site discriminate, that's why I'm here!! I've seen the "discrimination" first hand in my profession too, from people who just don't know any better, it stinks! I personally feel like numbers don't matter, it's just a terrible disease!
Any thoughts?

Tags: blame, discrimination, fault, shame, type2

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I believe that type two's are often labelled as "bringing it on themselves", especially if a person is a little overweight. I really think that people need to be told that Type 2's don't bring this condition on themselves. It was only last week, on tv, that I heard type 2's being described as a condition which affects obese people.
Wow, that sounds dangerous to me. What if someone who is a little overweight isn't getting checked or seeking medical care for diabetic symptoms because they think it is only a disease for "obese" people...I am overweight and have yo-yoed much of my adult life...My doctor told me that I could lose every pound of excess weight and my diabetes would still progress over time..so sad!
I'M TYPE 2 AND I'M NOT OVERWEIGHT, MINES HEREDITY. IT'S NOT ALL ABOUT OBESITY.
True, Laura, same here...always been thin....exercised, ate balanced meals...etc etc...but it's in the family, on both sides...type 1 and type 2...that said, I could just as easily have ended up with type 1....it still would have been diabetes!
Yea, I'm a thin Type 2 as well so I don't get discriminated against BUT I have heard things mentioned about overweight Type 2's that they brought it on themselves and it really irritates me. Being a type 2, one thing I recently heard was this: "oh, you have diabetes?? Is it type 2 or the real kind"? That really threw me for a loop! : )
I've had that line too EsMom....also, "You can't have diabetes, you're thin"
I once had a type 1 tell me that type 2 was the "wuss" form of diabetes.
iI once had a type two diabetic tell me that if iI had taken better care of myself, after telling them that I had type one, I wouldn't have to be on insulin. And I apparently should have been on a no carb diet.
Both of those are priceless! Did they say how you were supposed to have taken better care of yourself? As for the no carb diet, you better like fried pork skins (they are 0 carbs).
Generalizations don't tend to help anyone, Lizmarie.

This type one doesn't to get lumped in with the general public's idea of what type two diabetes is because the general public's idea is inaccurate. If I were to pass out at work from a low blood sugar, my co-workers would likely not give me anything to bring my sugar up.

In fact, at my last job I went low one day and needed to find something to bring my blood sugar up. A co-worker suggested insulin. Right. That would have gone well. A lot of the frustrating/dangerous stereotypes that are made about the disease come from 'education' (said with a sarcastic tone) about type two diabetes that you see in media. It comes down to frustration with education, more then it comes down to 'discrimination' for me. This seems to be one of the few diseases out there where anyone off the street feels comfortable telling you how you should be treating it and how you should be acting. It's nuts.
There is NO getting better... It is all tight control -- it never gets cured. Type 2 is a progressive illness, and with time, becomes harder and harder to manage... leading to many of the same complications Type 1's experience. My dad died from this, and he sure NEVER got better. Sorry, but the diseases have more in common than they have different. I know, Type 1's don't want to get 'lumped in' with all the supposedly fat people that get Type 2... Stereotypes, stereotypes... But you can believe what you want to believe, if it makes you feel better, somehow, about your diabetes.
Liz, im sorry if i offended you , what i am saying is that there's a margin that allows type two to get better ( not a complete recovery)and can push the type one away for a periode of time. You gain time. Its not a matter of making me feel better about my diabetes at all , and its not about not getting 'lumped in" with anything. I have people in my family that died from type one and type two but what im saying, is that type two dont have to jump to insuline right away. Its a positive thing, embrace it.

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