I had a piece of cheesecake and a mini eclair last weekend for the first time in months. I generally stay away from those items. But I took like 7 units and was pretty much fine. Now I am thinking what's the harm in having sweets with dinner or something if I bolus properly or have an ice cream sundae. Is that a bad way to think since maybe I got lucky just this one time.

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If you can manage to keep control of your blood sugars I think it's fine. I have been a type 1 since 1994 and was never able to maintain control eating like that. I actually went years eating all those goodies and basically ended up not covering anything I ate. Today I cover everything that goes in my mouth! I only eat low carb and never eat sweets because of fear I may fall back into my old habits.

Good luck and don't deny your self. If you can control your Blood sugars indulge once in a while. Life is to short!
Valid question, Rich. I don't eat dessert, but I would assume people who do bolus for it! The reasons why you might want to limit this? To some extent, yes, you got lucky. The more carbs you eat, the harder it is to accurately bolus and the more insulin you take the easier it is to make an error and go high or low. In addition, obviously those things can cause weight gain and weight gain can lead to insulin resistance which none of us want. Also taking higher doses of insulin can contribute to insulin resistance, so those are reasons that even if it works in the short term you might want to limit intake of foods like that in the longrun. Finally, as Yolanda says, carbs in general and sweets in particular are addictive so it's hard to limit them. Harder for some people than others. For me I was totally addicted to sugar so I haven't eaten it at all for 17 years and that's much easier for me. YMMV.
What are considered larger doses regarding insulin resistance in the future. My breakfast and lunch are about 4-5 units with dinner being about 7 units with an extended bolus.

Weight gain is not a problem, I am looking to put on a few pounds.
Cheesecake has a lot of fat that delays the carb effect, so hope you were ok hours later. Personally, I don't think this is a good thing to do regularly. The eat-what-you-want-take-insulin approach isn't a prescription for good control & health. My goal is to take as little insulin as possible. Large insulin doses lead to weight gain, swings between high & low that are hard to manage, can lead to insulin resistance, high blood pressure & other circulatory/heart problems.
If you can handle it, I don't see the harm. I don't subscribe to the 'low carb' theory of thought, so that's not an issue for me. I eat things like desserts rarely, but when I do, I don't feel hesitant about it. I bolus and watch my BG a little more carefully. If I'm rising fast afterwards I may also increase my basal rate a little bit. I get a bit irked by the people who claim that it's never ok to eat what you want and bolus for it. I do this, I always have. I maintain a 5.9% A1c. The key is knowing what you CAN and CANNOT handle. If you can't handle it, then obviously it's not a good idea. But if you can (as in, you don't spike really high afterwards, you don't bounce between high and low, you don't see a lot of weight gain from insulin use), I don't see the harm.
Not to worry . just as long as you get good Bg's , what's the harm, except maybe gain a few Pounds if you do it regularly..LOL

Test 2 and 3 thru 4 hrs after and see how things go..
actaully Cheesecake is on my list of Lighter Deserts to have.. I'll have a McD's IceCream sundae with Hot Fudge and no problems with it if dose right and I have decent BG's beforehand..
Why wouldn't you bolus for desserts? I bolus for everything.
Always. If you don't then you'll fall out of range. If I know I won't be able to portion control, then I pass. If I just want a taste, I steal a bite from my husband and skip the bolus. I've found that it's harder to bolus for sweets since they're often homemade and it's harder to get an accurate carb count. You still have to live your life, even with diabetes, and it's good to have some sweets once and a while.
Cheesecake = high in fat along with the sugar = easy in terms of managing BG. I find things like ice cream and reese's peanut butter cups a little TOO easy to bolus for, because they're a nice balance of fat/sugar to prevent spikes.

There really is no harm if you get good post-meal #'s.. the bigger problem may come in the form of buying larger pants :)
There is no harm in having an occassional dessert if you are bolussing for it. It is sometimes good to let your hair down as long as you check a couple of hours later. But usually if I have a dessert I just put in a bit extra insulin after the event because then I know roughly what I have eaten and I end up fine a few hours later.
I don't see why you shouldn't have dessert provided you bolus for it and you're not eating the entire pie in one sitting. Going through life denying yourself is kinda pointless. Plus anything that you deny yourself then becomes 'forbidden' and then you end up craving it more.
I am not a big dessert fan mostly from counting the carbs? Like Sarah said, it's the pantsometer more than the glucometer for me!

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