personally, i have experimented with drinking alcohol; i always thought that because alcohol has sugar in it, that my BS would go sky-high and that i would start spilling Ketones, ect. but the odd thing was that when ever i drank, my BS stayed remarkably in control and even on the low side. i dont know why and i was just curious. has anyone had this experience? i havent tasted alcohol since 2000. just wanted to know what other D do.

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I have a glass or two of wine with dinner with no effect on my blood sugar. I have a very occasional beer with dinner but only if my meal is very low carb and I bolus 14 grams for the beer (I drink dark beers). Once in a great while I will go out somewhere and drink more in an evening - mostly wine - and I test frequently especially before bed because I can go a bit low.

Zoe, i didnt mention that i havent been a drinker since 1987, but i did go to AA; it saved my life; i am now almost 12 yrs sober. (and i go to AlAnon, too).i just remember the days B4 i started drinking after i was dx with D; it was miserable. i was simply wondering if anyone had this experience.

i appreciate your reply, and welcome all others!

Congratulations on turning your life around.

The reason that one tends to go low when drinking is that when the liver is working on processing the alcohol it can't/doesn't spit out glucose. Some of us jokingly call red wine, red insulin. And just like with insulin, you have to be careful when you drink or you can end up in trouble.

I used to be fine with vodka and diet coke. The stranger the colour the more I avoided them, those alco pop thingys. I personally got so fed up with other people's drinking ( Irish people drink far too much ), I just don't bother anymore. I would much prefer something sweet to eat. Well done to you Daisy, no words to say how difficult a road it is. Red Insulin, interesting. The Wrath of the Grapes.

Ha! The Wrath of the Grapes!

Another thread talks about free food: wine is free for me, my beer needs to be covered for 14g, and both of them cause a low later. Expecting those lows keep me moderate with alcohol.

I used to be a fan of whiskey and coke, but since I've quit soda and juice I've avoided most cocktails (though I was pleasantly surprised to discover a frozen daiquiri place with a sugar-free option). If I drink, I'll usually stick to one or two beers and I'm good for the entire evening -- I take 1mg of Prandin beforehand to cover it, and any sort of meal accompanying it. I've noticed since being diagnosed it's a lot easier to get drunk, so I try to be careful with my alcohol intake, and drink as much water (if not more).

I drink wine and it does not affect my blood glucose if I am moderate, which is always. With wine, the grape juice's sugar is changed to alcohol, which reduces carbs. A 5-ounce glass of dry white table wine may have 1.0 to 1.25 grams of carbohydrates, while a similar portion of red may go up to 2.5 grams. I never blous for wine, as the wine will actually lower my blood glucose levels a bit.

Beer is another story. A 12 ounce portion of light beer can be as low as 4.4 and other heavier beer can be 16 to 18. If I do drink a beer, I bolus for 15 carbs.

I don't like liquor at all.

I'm still new to wine. I've only cooked with red and white wine but would like to have red or white for a meal, you know socially. What should I look for? How should I prepare and treat for a glass of red wine?

Pour in glass, pick up glass, sip and savor! There is really nothing to do to prepare for a glass of red one.

One or two glasses of red wine should have little effect on your blood sugar, especially if drank with your meal. But check your blood sugar at your usual two hour pp and make sure for the first couple times.In my experience if I drink more than that, and if its not with food than I might go low later, like before bedtime.

I get no crash, and a continual raising of glucose with Red wine.
It's very slow, but it's there, so it's a situation where I'll check it after an hour or so and adjust accordingly.

Beer, again no crash, but I dose it accordingly to the carb content of the beer, and there seems to be a residual gain after the 5 hours of insulin use in the same way fatty food seems to outlast the insulin and then step on the pedal and begin to rise. I'm not completely sure what causes this.

Spirits. Nothing, but when I was on a slow acting, it could cause a crash. With fast acting/pump only. No effect at all.

If in fact your observations are accurate, and that your rise in bg levels is not due to a high carb meal, then you are the exception that confirms rule #1 of diabetes management: It is a highly individual disease, so although we can listen to other people's advice our primary resource is our bg meter and the lab tests our doctor refers us to. That aside, it is the first time I've heard a report of BG levels going up from drinking redwine, and I've been participating in online discussion groups on diabetes since my diagnosis 14 years ago.

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