As I am writing down my result and units of long and quick acting insulin this morning in my logbook (on my last day of MDI before getting Podded tomorrow!) I realized that I won't have to do that part of my routine anymore either! Right??

Since all my info will be in the PDM I don't see any reason to use a logbook or am I crazy?

I am so freakin' excited for tomorrow!!! It is going to be such a huge change, and I am ready for it.

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thanks for the tip. I don't have an iPad but I'll see if I can get the app for my Droid.

There actually is a Mobile app for the Droid:
MyNetDiary Mobile Apps

The Ideal Mobile Diet Tools
To make it even easier to keep track of your diet in the modern fast-paced world, we provide mobile apps for the iPhone, Android, BlackBerry® and iPad. All of the apps can work with your MyNetDiary account - use them on the go, and the web site when at home or office.

I still use my logbook. It is easier to see your values that going into the PDM.
I have been logging for 10 years and don't intend to stop.

I highly recommend Medtronic's (even though I DO use Omnipod) Insulin Pump Daily Journal booklet. I won't lie and say I log in it every single day, but find it extremely helpful in recording responses to (not to mention my carb guesses for!) specific meals, exercise, temp basals and site changes. My Endo likes to look over these records to complement the CoPilot downloads, as the entries provide additional detail. There are fields for BG, Carbs, Bolus, Corrections, Basal rates, Exercise notes and site changes. There is also lots of space for meal specifics and other notes - each booklet holds about 30 days of info.
Cheers!

I assume you have excellent control. When my sugar start going up for no apparent reason i start a food diary in a notebook. Your log book sounds very thorough.
Keep up the good work. What is your A1C if you want to tell?

Most recent A1C was 6.3 - so definitely not optimum, but better than the 7.4 from the same time last year before I started detailed logging. :)
I use the logbook to track my experiments/results for getting around the pod change highs (grrr). I still haven't come up with the right algorithm yet for that.

Wow that is wonderful i had 6.5 on Lantus but i am allergic to it.
My most recent was 6.8.

I used a log book at the very beginning and I think you may want to continue yet for a while as you work out the basl rates and adjusments. I recall making quite a few tweeks to basal/bolus rates in the very beginning but after a couple of months I did stop and do not keep a log book now as I download using the co-pilot program and use it as my log, I use my PDM as my meter and also input all of my carb intake each time I eat so I can get some pretty nice reports and pay attention to certain meals if they are causing me problems or not. If I notice a trend than I can get more specific again and while I have not had to use a logbook in the last 1 1/2 years it may come back into play. Guess it comes down to what you are comfortable with...Good Luck and Happy Podding, I still remember my first day! Take care ~Schmutz

Does the sensor help give better control? Does your pump come with a sensor?

Hi Margaret, you had a question about a sensor and not sure if your were asking it of me or not? Not sure if your asking about a cgm sensor or something else? I'd be happy to try and answer your question if you let me know more about what you looking for. ~Schmutz

Thanks! I do have a separate notepad I am using to log all my exercise and basal reductions, etc.

So far I am in total love with the OmniPod! Love!!!

Do you wear a sensor with the omnipod?

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