How many times have you heard that? When?

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Ooo, I like your idea, Zoe. Sorry, can't eat that. I have ACS, anaphylatic carb syndrome, with hand to throat & swallowing hard.

Pitiful that simply saying no thanks isn't sufficient. People aren't owed an explanation about not eating sugar or anything. Somehow, because it's not the usual, we feel compelled to offer a reason.

People are always surprised when I say I don't eat any starch, even though they all get the no sugar bit. Even close friends have trouble keeping that one straight. I don't fault them for that though, my diet is not exactly mainstream. If someone seems surprised I sometime add "My meter says I can't eat that", which takes me out of the "follower of strange fad diet" category.

A lot and I will tell you this. If someone says; "Don't eat that" I gurantee that I will eat it just to tick them off.

This made me smile :)

Yesterday at the hairdressers, she gave me choc fish with my coffee and then she came back and said "Oh you can't eat those can you"

Chocolate fish???

Though I think the "D Police" are interfering idiots, I do wonder if sometimes people are just trying to be helpful. Everyone knows I don't eat sugar, so if someone was passing around a box of cookies and said, "Oh, sorry, Zoe, I forgot you don't eat those" I would consider it considerate of them.

Since most non-D's think the only thing we have to avoid is sugar and that all diabetics "can't" eat sugar, it would be considerate to say, "Oh, you can't eat those can you?"

And....chocolate fish???

OK, I'll bite 15 carbs. Did you use chocolate worms to catch this one?

:-)

I hear that all the time from my g-mother who by the way makes all this carb rich stuff for our family get togethers.

There are about 3 of us diabetics who go to her house all the time and there are 6 ppl at them who aren't. My daughter & I and my 2nd cousin (who's a Type 2 herself me & my daughter are the Type 1's out of the bunch) EVERYTIME we start to eat she's the food police going around to all our plates and telling us what we can have & what we can't. Gotta love her though.

My recent story with a pleasant twist : we had Lunch at the Hilton Hawaiian Village this past week , took my glucometer out of by backpack and proceeded to check my BG when the waitress came over and asked if I was a type 1 or 2 , I responded , she shared that her son of 13 years was diagnosed 3 years ago ( an avid surfer , not a pumper ...I shared with Mom about the OmniPod( tubeless ) !! ) I ordered my meal with a bit of discussion with the waitress : Greek Salad ( loads of tomatoes ) with a slice of local bread . Mom Waitress served and asked how many carbs I would bolus for the bread ( she thought 20 )I added a bit more for all the other ingredients ...my thought : nice to have such a knowledgebale person I get to talk with in Paradise

Every time my family has a gathering. I have this one obnoxious cousin that says, loudly, "You aren't supposed to be eating that!"

I grew up with "Natalie, don't eat that -- you'll get diabetes!" because my grandmother had diabetes and the family was terrified of it. This does NOT leave a sweet taste in the mouth of a child, and as soon as I could, I rebelled and gave myself permission to eat all the carbs and sweets I wanted. And, as the years passed, I DID gain weight, although I never hit the obese point. And as my mother got older and older, and got round (but also, never obese), and never got diabetes, nor any sign of any metabolic or autoimmune disorder in her 70's (she died at age 80, of COPD), I thought I was home safe.

So when I started showing the signs of oncoming diabetes, and was told I was hyperglycemic (old standards -- would have been diagnosable these days), all I could do was bawl, and listen to all the voices in my head saying "I told you so, I told you so!" BAAAAD VIBES!

So at this point, NO ONE tells me I can't eat something. I'M the only one who can do that. I'm lucky in that my friends respect my choices, and I readily admit that I don't always follow my own ideals for what I SHOULD be eating. But at least it's a conscious choice, and the only proviso is the deal that I made with myself which is that I MUST take ENOUGH insulin to cover what I eat, and if it means staying up all night correcting (like I did on Tuesday), then so be it.

I know that my family treated me like that because they cared about me and my health, but what a burden to put on a child!

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