Hi All,

I'm looking for people who have taken the GRE test in the past couple of years and are familiar with the current paperwork that needs to be completed in advance. Since the GRE is administered on a computer now, requesting accommodations is a different process than for other standardized tests. Can someone let me know if you've gone through the requesting accommodations process for the GRE recently? Specifically what you needed to do to get extra time and extra breaks? It appears to be a more complicated process than for other standardized tests.

While of course I'm sure there are people out there with experience from the SAT and other standardized tests, I'm specifically looking for people who have recently taken the GRE with type 1 diabetes.

Thanks everyone!

Tags: GRE, testing

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Define "couple of years." When I took it we still used cuneiform tablets for responding.

ps. You can get appropriate accomodations for the GRE, just like the SAT. But you need to document your condition (it is not trivial) and you need to do it well ahead of time.

Couple of years: 2 or 3.

Thanks for the tip, I've thoroughly explored that link. I know I'll ultimately have no problem getting the accommodations I need, there's just conflicting information on exactly what paperwork to provide. While I certainly can sort it out by calling ETS, I thought I'd post of TuD just to see if anyone has done it recently.

No advice here on the accomodations but I just wanted to wish you luck! My daughter took the GRE on computer 2 years ago but she is not diabetic. It sounds like you're at the beginning of a wonderful adventure in grad school!

Thanks for the warm wishes!

My daughter took the LSAT's this summer. They are very security conscious now and won't let you bring in any purses, backpacks, cell phones. She had to put personal items in a clear ziplock baggie. The only food or drink allowed had to be in a sealed bottle or can. When my son took the GRE's they were on computers with cameras aimed at him. What specific accomodations would you need as a diabetic. I would think you could bring supplies in as long as they were clearly labeled.

I've heard the LSATs are much stricter than the GREs. From the ETS website I understand it's no problem to get extended time, unlimited breaks, and to have snacks and my meter and cgm with me in the room. I know with the proper documentation I'll be able to get all of this-- I just wanted to know if anyone on TU had been through the process of getting the paperwork filed, but given the lack of responses, it seems like maybe not!

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