I would like to find out as much as i can on this Here lately i have days where i crave sugar real bad and i will fall asleep without knowing i have i eat a pretty healthy diet i was a cage fighter and still train but i got hurt and put on weight right in my gut and i'm having a hard time losing weight and my muscle seem weaker i'm at a lose please help

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John,

Welcome to the wonderful world of Diabetes...

A couple of things...if you are seeing a GP (regular doctor)...I highly suggest that you visit a good Endo. They have the experience to determine exact causes and treatments for different types of diabetics.

Secondly...I to have had an issue with muscle strength/loss. It comes from a low level of Testosterone. Visit the following link and do a little reading.

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mens-hea...

The good news is that it is very treatable...the bad news is...if you ignore this symtom...ED is next.

Good luck to you sir...

Michael
welcome, john. you're in a good place here -- tons of helpful information and friendly people who really care, and know what it's like to live with diabetes.

aside from tudiabetes, here's the best resource i found when i was diagnosed type 2:
http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

this site is written by jenny ruhl, who also posts here sometimes, and includes great information about how to get your blood sugar under control, a list of good books to read, diabetes on a budget and lots more.

as for your sugar cravings, i had that problem too and can tell you that if you can just hold out for a week or so, the cravings really do go away. getting my diet figured out made a HUGE difference in how hungry i felt, and what i was hungry for. for me, it turned out i had to actually eat MORE often, five or six times a day, but small meals with protein and a little healthy fat, and very low carbohydrate. this helped me lose about 35 lbs in just over 3 months. there's lots of good information on this site about nutrition and exercise -- just ask questions and there's always someone who can help.

good luck to you and let us know how you're doing!
Hey welcome John, as the others said the cravings should pass. I am a Type 2 also so maybe this will help.

If you continue to have these cravings especially after meals talk to your Dr. They have a couple of products that may help with this with an added benefit that cause weight loss and help with cravings as you describe. Metformin or Byetta are two that come to mind. As with all of us, the main thing is to have our sugars controlled. As to falling asleep I had that problem when my sugars were out of control. I would be in the chair and all of a sudden I was sleeping. That ended once my Blood Sugars got back to where they should be. Again, welcome and a bunch of us are here to help....
I'm on metformin now 500 mg once a day now and now i'm taking a testosterone shot once a month so maybe all this will level out i'm at a lost on it so thank you for your replies
Sometimes you will get cravings because you are malnourished, especially if your blood sugar isn't under good control. A multivitamin will help with that.

As far as the sweet goes, some people say that the newly referenced flavor, umami, has been found to take care of sweet cravings. These can be found in MSG, but also in mushrooms and savory foods like seafood, meat and cheeses. So, supposedly, if you eat something like mushroom, tomato, meat or cheese when you are craving fudge, the craving will go away. Not sure if that is true. You should try it, though.
Welcome to our community, John. I guess, the best I can suggest is to take things one at a time, as to not overwhelm yourself, and really soak in what you learn. In this site, there will be a lot of helpful information as to how to best approach your Diabetes: there will be different posts on diet, exercise, medications, additional treatments, glucometers, etc. There are also groups you can surf through, and join, according to your needs. Check out our New Member Guide as a reference on how to surf this community.

There are some basic guidelines I have learned for myself as to how to best treat my Type 2 Diabetes:

  • Test, test, test. Always test your pre and post meals blood sugar, and write down what you ate. If you do not know how bad of a reaction you are having from a meal, or a snack, or what you ate, you will not know how to modify or fix it.
  • Cut down on your carbohydrates. Carbohydrates turn into simple sugars in the blood, when processed by the liver. Some of them more slowly than others. But fast processing carbohydrates, or refined sugars, will give you a faster jolt in sugar, and often leave you having a shorter sense of fullness and satisfaction. These are: white breads, high starches like rice and potatoes, candies, and syrups. A good way for me to control my carbs was to limit each of my meals to about 30 g of carbs to begin with, and then add or cut down on them, depending on the reaction. Complex carbohydrates will take longer to burn, such as multi-grain, whole wheat bread, or pastas. I did it this way, so I didn't feel deprived. Some folks go down to the very basic carbs, like just veggies, for a few days, to see the reactions they will have, how bad, and then slowly add some carbs until whatever level they can tolerate the most.
  • Lowering your sugar level is not an overnight process. It took me about a week and a half, to two weeks, to get to the level I was wanting.
  • As little as 15 minutes of exercise, such as walking, 3 times a week or after a meal heavy in carbohydrates, can help reduce your blood sugar, or reduce your blood sugar spike after a meal.
  • When you have sweet cravings, you can fool the body into having sweets, without really having them. There are plenty of low carb, no-sugar, sweets recipes in this site. A quick treat for me is milk (or cream), cocoa powder, stevia (I use truvía) , and ice, in the blender. Tastes naughty... but it's not.
  • You can still have sugar in your diet, as long as you count it in like any other carbohydrate, in your diet. i.e., I never have any more than 15 g of carb in a snack (if any, at all). So, if you want to have one mini sneakers once a in Halloween, it's fine.
  • Water. Drink lots and lots of water. Water helps the kidneys do what they need to do best, which is filter impurities, and keep the system going. Avoid drinking a lot of fruit juices, sodas (even diet sodas, as too much caffeine can spike blood sugars in some individuals, and the fake sweetener can cause bloating, and colon irritations, particularly in persons with thyroid problems), and energy drinks (which most solely derive their energy from a huge amount of sugar, in various forms). Juices are a lot of fruit, concentrated, into one serving, and can carry a big amount of sugar. Lots of so called %100 juices, like Ocean Spray, only have as much as 18% juice in them, and whatever juice they have is not 100% of that fruit they claimed on the label.
  • You can subtract the Dietary Fiber off of the amount of total carbs for an item, and get the 'net carbs' you can consume for that item. The body doesn't process dietary fiber until it reaches the colon, if at all. So it helps with regularity,and won't raise blood sugar.
  • Other tools, such as the glycemic load, are very helpful in determining how high is a food likely to spike your blood sugars. Good sites on dietary information for foods, how many carbs, and how much glycemic load are www.nutritiondata.com, and www.mendosa.com.
  • A good site for beginners to learn about Diabetes is Blood Sugar 101. They have lots of information on how Diabetes works, what types there are, what you need to know when you visit a doctor, and different types of medications.
  • Be kind to yourself... If after you've made significant modifications in diet, and exercise, your blood sugars are still unaffected (or high), you may need a higher dose of medication, or even insulin.
  • Join a group in the community, where others also have a common goal, or may have similar struggles... Such as a weightloss group within our community, or a group for Type 2 diabetics on Met. It helps to share common frustrations with one another. :)
  • Again, and again... when it all seems frustrating, and overwhelming, just take it one step at a time... :) and read, read, READ. :) Knowledge is power.

Best of luck to ya... :) We're all in this together.

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