I am currently in the hospital and the doctors are talking about getting me a insulin pump it will be my first time, what do yall think about insulin pumps are they helpful? Is it better then taking Insulin shots?

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Oh My That is a loaded topic here. LOL But definitely, it is, it is like comparing bologna to steak. I use U500 in my pump and use the animas ping which I am thrilled with. Love my pump. A pump in general if it is doing it's job will help your sugars do better no matter which one it is. So much easier than MDI. NO more endless daily sticks and packing needles everywhere you go and pulling them out to inject. Just bolus and eat. It is as good for us as it is besides a new pancreas. Hope you do much better and get out of that hospital soon. Are you there for DKA?
No ma'am i am here for pancreatitis. thnk u ! =)
I sure hope you get better soon. I think a pump will do a lot of good for you. I have a animas ping which has a remote for it and has a good company to back it up. There is also minimed who I here is a good company too. These both are great options. Either way pumps are great things. Pumps rock!!!!
me too! thanks
Im starting my Ping on the 8th of October, so i cannot answer your question due to experience. However, everyone I have talked to, as well as my basic intuition and understanding tell me its a very good device (pumps in general, not just the Ping), and once everything like basil rates are figured out, it is a life changing thing. Im excited
its ok thanks anyway!!
Krystle,

I've been on a pump for nine months now. I wish I could have gone straight to a pump when I was dignosed with type 1 back in 1957. I'm sure you know pumps haven't been around that long. ;^) With MDI therapy, I was injecting 12 to 15 times and some times more in the three days that I now inject only once. I'm checking my BG more often (10-12/day) but finger sticks are nothing and my overall control has greatly improved. My A1C went from 7.0 to 6.5 in the first three months. Another bonus for me is that Medicare pays for all insulin, but only if delivered via a pump. Go figure.
I know how ya feel on those a1c's, isn't that great!! Mine in the first three months went from 8 to 6.4. I was like yay!!!!
my a1c has been over 15 for the past like 12 yrs i cant seem to lower it cause of my high bs
yes i understand and thanks for the help
Pump= amazing! so much easier! i love my pump!
my a1c's are better! i don't go low as much!
this is my first time gettin one so i am kinda nervous but thanks for the help and respond

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