Insulin pumps and dresses--how do you manage it, ladies?

Now it's time to ask the first question that popped into my head when I started seriously looking into a pump. Wait for it--what if I want to wear a dress? Since I've got around 10 lovely dresses in my closet that I wear fairly frequently, it's a rather pressing question. ;)

Pump-wearing ladies, how do you manage? I'm especially wondering about bolusing while when the pump is somewhere less than easily accessible.

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I have a Ping, so bolusing when the pump is in 'deep recesses' somewhere isn't a issue. There are loads of ways to wear it. My favorite is the 'thigh thing'. It's a stretchy pouch that goes on your thigh, with a garter to hold it up. Also makes it easy to access the pump if you don't have a remote under the tablecloth or whatever ;) A lot of women tuck them in their bras, or clip them to the side of the bra.

A baby sock holds a pump really snugly, and can be safety pinned almost anywhere.

I love dresses, especially in the summer. I stick my pump down the front of my bra (I wear a lot of those cami-type bras because I am not, er, very busty). Anyway, to keep my pump from getting all sweaty and slimy, I put it in a baby sock and THEN down my bra. Works like a charm. I whip it out to bolus and change basal rates and I am really getting to the point where I don't care what people think (at work, I'm a little more discrete).

I may give a leg holster a try again. I tried it once and found that it slipped too much throughout the day.

I do that too when I wear a dress. One thing I've found over the years with a pump is to buy many skirts and some tops to go with then then u can just clip the pump to ur skirt.

This is one of the main reasons I switched from a tubed pump to the Omnipod. On my Minimed, the pump would go in my bra, so the only way to bolus was to go to the bathroom to pull it out. Needless to say, that caused me to pretty much stop wearing my dresses and skirts. Now on the Omnipod, I have no issues and can wear anything I want.

I clip mine onto my underwear xD but I bought a friend of mine a garter for HER insulin pump so maybe I will get one too.

I use the Omnipod and stick it on my inner thigh,no problem. The dress can be as tight and revealing as you want (although at my age I tend not to wear anything too skimpy!) because the large portion (the PDM) I carry in my purse, not on me.

I have a Ping and usually wear it in my bra. It keep s the tubing where it doesn't catch on anything as well. I bolus using the remote.

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