So i have been diabetic for over 4 years now. I dont want anyones pitty just help and advice. I just recently got out of the hospital with dka reason being i was sick with the flu that i just could not get my blood sugar down. I was on my death bed litterly. So what i am asking i need to know what the best way to get my blood sugar down to normal i am checking 8 times a day and taking a lot of insulin. I am eating healthy and etc. I need help to figure out the best way to relax and get this done. So any opinions are needed.

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You don't say too much about your management, Samantha, so I'll just throw out some general ideas. The best way to get your blood sugar down is to try and prevent it from going too far up in the first place! Once you get up into the stratosphere it's harder to get it down. But should you have a high, moderate or extreme the best ways to manage are to take corrections, being aware of the insulin on board so you don't stack. If you are very high (over 250) drinking a lot of water helps as well.

Having said that, I don't know if you know the basics and have a good regimen. I see you are on a pump. Do you have the book Pumping Insulin by John Walsh. It's very useful. Have you tested your basals to make sure all your rates are correct for the various times of day? Basal needs to be right first before you look at bolus. Then ae you confident of your I:C ratios? If you are running high 2 hours after your meals most of the time than your ratios need tweaking. Many of us have different ratios for different times of day. Do you know how to accurately carb count? You say you are "taking a lot of insulin". What is important is to take the right amount of insulin for your needs.. You also say you are eating healthy, but what does that mean to you? When I was diagnosed I told the cde that "I eat healthy. I'm a vegetarian, eat fresh foods and haven't eaten sugar for years." But I ate a lot of pasta, rice and cereal for breakfast and it was way too many carbs to manage successfully.

Relaxing is important too, you are absolutely right. So while you are working to get your numbers under control, do the things you enjoy so your life isn't just about Type 1!

I'm glad you're okay now. I've never experienced DKA but it sounds awful!

Enjoying life right now is kinda hard when you feel crapy. I need to understand when my sugars are not coming down and i really need to focus on this and it is very hard when i dont have the energy to do so. I am not longer on the pump. Reason being is i can not afford the supplies for it.

I am pretty much at my wits end with this. I just want to feel better .

The stress, and just being ill can cause havoc on our control. You just got out of the hospital from DKA, and have the flu. It is bad enough that you don't feel well, now your bg is causing you worry. Keep testing, and using however much insulin you need. It is good that you are able to eat! I hope you get well soon, your bg will follow when you do.

Hi Samantha that's the name of my little niece!
I think the best way is to keep you glucose in a range for example 80-150. Diabetes is diferente for any one, some people take more insuline daily than others and carbs act different too in aeach person. Another way to keep your glucose as normal as posible is being aware of the consecuence of a bad control. Keep informed about the bad control cause in your retines and kidneys, because there are no way to go back to normal. Be alert of your sintomes when your glucose is high or low to take accion. If you control the carbs of what you eat you can be relax for 3 to 4 hours because you always will have to check yourself before and 2-3hrs after meals.

More info please. For example your settings on the pump: the basal profile, your I:C ratios, your insulin sensitivity, the type of insulin you use and last but not least do you count carbs?

i am not using the pump any longer.

That is too bad. A pump is fantastic in these situations--just set a temporary basal rate to cover the effects of the illness. Probably would have helped avoid this.

Sometimes when you are sick and running high BGs, it is just necessary to take more insulin--a lot more than normal and it scares us. You have to play and find what works for you.

I am on MDI too. The questions remain:

-type of insulin for basal and bolus?
-application pattern for basal insulin?
-I:C ratio?
-insulin sensitivity?
-do you count carbs?

I would recommend you get back on the pump, and test more than 8 times a day. I test 12-16 times a day, and look at the bigger picture of my blood sugars weekly

Im using http://www.glooko.com/ to upload my readings from my device to my iphone. If you get it let me know, i made an app that will take those readings and graph them.

But keep eating healthy, try being active, even just going for a walk once a day, and never give up :).

I'd say, for the next 24-48 hours: drink water and drink something to replace your electrolytes. Try a high protein, very low carb diet for a few days. Don't eat as much as you normally would, and rest, sleep as much as you can.
Not sure of I should tell you this (because it has about 14 grams sugar in it) but a drink made by gatorade, called G2 Recovery really helps me, but no more than one bottle a day and only for the next two days, drink half bottle at a time.

I know i sound like a major hypocondraic but here are a few things that i am feeling right now and let me know if this is normal or if anyone has felt this way.

so i have major back and upper rib cage pain from gas.
My mouth feels funny under my tongue and really annoying feeling.

has anyone else felt this or is this normal from high blood sugars so i can put my mind at ease

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