I left town suddenly tonight and forgot to bring my lantus with me! I have no long-acting insulin right now and I'm freaking out. What can I do for tonight to get by without it? I usually take 12u at bedtime, but all the pharmacies are closed!

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Same thing happened to me last week except I was in a different country and was away for 6 days. I took out my Lantus the first night and almost fainted when I realized I had picked up the wrong pen when packing. I thought I'd taken the full pen with 300 units but instead had packed the almost empty one with 13 units. I usually take 21 units every night.

After panicking for a while, I calmed down and reminded myself that people on a pump do not take basal insulin, so for the next 6 days I would have to simulate pumping while on MDI.

Thankfully I had lots of quick-acting insulin with me so just checked a lot and tried to mimic the effect of a pump. The first morning, I was afraid I was going to wake up in DKA but my morning fasting BG was 140 which is not so great but also nothing to really freak out over. My morning FBG was consistently 130-140 throughout the six days without Lantus. It is normally 90-100.
I also take 12 units of Lantus but in the morning. So if I took 1u of Humalog every 2 hours that would be the equivalent?
Your arithmetic looks good to me. The important thing is to closely monitor your BG with many more fingersticks until you're comfortable that things are in control. I know that's harder to do through the night but I would set my alarm for every 2-3 hours to check and dose as needed.
It's about 2:20 PM CST and how are you doing? -- your blood sugars still running good???? I've been reading the thread and am just kinda worried about you.
I got it all figured out! I managed to get the pharmacy to call my doctor yesterday and got the lantus that I needed. I split my dose in 2 and now I'm back on my normal schedule. I didn't get it until about 2PM (EST) so I did have to keep an eye on my bg most of the morning. But it wasn't too bad, it was just weird to see how it wouldn't go down all morning; but at least I could keep it from going up!
weird thing, last night i forgot to take lantus (usually take 14 unit), i slept great & woke up with 88 fasting bg, and all day my bg was in the 80s....so today was only 9 units of rapid insulin. So the advice is just control your food portions for the day.
Weird! The only other time I've forgotten my lantus was a night after a heavy dinner so I did wake up to see a bg of almost 300 that morning. That's why I was really afraid to go without it again!

Do you think you were going low and then high to compensate with 14 units? I'm pretty sure that was happening to me when I used to take 16 units because I would wake up between 180 and 250 every morning when I was taking that much.

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