No Words to Speak and Nothing to Say... I'm a T1 Diabetic.

I'm a newly dx'd T1 who as a professional communicator can find no words to express how I feel. It's been a little over a month since being told my BG was over 600 with a subsequent A1C of 15+. I can't come to be angry because there's no one to be angry at and I can't come to cry because there's nothing to really be sad about. That said I'm just stuck at a point of confusion wanting aswers where apparently none exist.

As a former elite distance runner who's now 38, I've seen ups and downs and am no stranger to adversity. The crazy part is I haven't found the nerve to tell my family and if I hadn't been admitted to the hospital after finding out, I'm not even sure what I would've told my Fiancee. I know I have no reason to be or feel ashamed, but as someone who's always been seen as the cool, calm, and collected one I'm just haven't found the words to say, "I'm a T1 Diabetic".


NewT1Brotha

Views: 1881

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

WELCOME...you've found a great place to find your words...words that will build YOUR story!

wow you are 38 and just diagnose with type 1. Whats going on in this world. i hear more cases of older people getting type 1. This illness is growing exponentially i am, afraid.

Alessio, I was diagnosed at age 58. It isn't so much that there are more cases of older people, it is that people are beginning to correctly diagnose us.

you are right :) . And i also feel that there is a big crowd out there who is still misdiagnosed or not even diagnose yet. :( . In the past month i heard 2 more cases of acquaintances with T1DM

Unfortunately, you are right. Even though I think awareness is growing that Type 1 is not just a childhood diagnosis, people are still misdiagnosed.

I'm not sure if it's misdiagnosis or something entirely else. I mean Diabetes doesn't run in my family (on either side)and I've never had any issues with my blood glucose levels ever being abnormal in any of my lab tests. I even went back and double, strike that, triple checked and NADA. In my situation I'm convinced that it was a quality of life issue and specifically stress that caught up with me. Stress can be every bit as dangerous as a real disease. Especially in the way tjhat one's body reacts to stress. But I hear you Zoe. Whatever it is more attention needs to be paid to it becuase it's becoming more and more common.

In the case of T1, there are OFTEN no other cases in the family. And it can hit very quickly. Blood tests can be entirely normal a couple of months before it hits, and then BOOM! That's just the way it is, so now's the time to work on it, and learn all you can, and get on with your life. Good luck, brotha! :-)

Oh, I was actually talking about the adult Type 1's who have slow onset (LADA) and are misdiagnosed as Type 2's. However it got here (I'm sure you're right about how it happened for you), you do sound like a clear type 1 and you have a good quality of acceptance about that out-of-the-blue shock in your other post.

My new T1Brotha, It has been one year since I was diagnosed at the age of 44..I am a pumper and it made my life so much easier.. I just started training for a 5K..I am not sure when I will be ready but I just stay in trainig and it seems to help (I have never ran before in my life, except to catch a plane) As for the confusion, it really never goes away but I try to keep putting acceptance in it's place and pray that the "One" above continues to give me the patience I need.. I just entered by first chili cook off--yes, I never have done that either and I won 3rd out of 25!! Since I now try to cook very diabetically,(LOL) I thought what the heck!! So, just keep in mind, we can really do anything now because we live with this day to day craziness and still keep a smile on our face..Love, peace and Broccoli--Jujube

That's fantastic Jujube!!! Thanks for the kind words and thoughts.

Hi:

Sorry you have to go through this, but welcome to the group; keep reading all you can on the boards, they contain a wealth of information. I have kept my disease pretty much to myself; other than medical professionals, I've told one sister and one friend. No one at work knows except the PA in Occ Health. My CDE strongly encouraged me to fill her in. Like you, I was a decent runner (not elite), completed over 30 marathons, have always eaten well, so I choose not to try and explain this T1 mess to folks who don't have a clue. I was diagnosed 3 1/2 years ago at the age of 59, and it took me a little over a year to begin to accept what had happened to me. Hopefully, you will get there quicker than I did.

Sue

I have not read the other replies - but for me I would say... (i found out from my mom who got the call from the doc so telling family was easy)..I would say it as it comes up- like oh I have started looking at some new ways to eat becuz i found out... or next holiday state - well when we come over not ice cream cake for me becuz the doc says with T1 i gotta limit my carbs...
this is how I tell friends now days - I dont sit them down and have the I got T1 talk - its just a part of me - it does not define me

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Meet The 2014 Big Blue Test Grant Recipients

  This year Diabetes Hands Foundation has pledged US$35,000 in Big Blue Test grants, continuing its support for programs aimed at providing lifesaving supplies, medical tests, treatment, and patient education to people living in need who have or at risk Read on! →

Kim Vlasnik: The Patient Voice

  Kim Vlasnik, you NAILED it! In this video, Kim Vlasnik takes our breath away as she describes what its like to be a person with diabetes. Fortunately, Stanford’s Medicine-X Conference gives ePatients, like Kim, a chance to speak since we carry the Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service