So I don't have this problem that often but when I do it is so frustrating. Does anyone have quick fixes/suggestions for when you bolus for everything on your plate but then don't eat it all? Sucks when you're doing the right thing but then your BG drops low later.

Tags: eating, lows, not

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I make up the lost carbs with something easier to eat, skim milk or carby beer can run about 10G (some beer is "thicker" but Guinness is 9G for 12 oz so I count the "draft cans" as 10 and it's close enough...)/ serving. I just eat the stuff on my plate most of the time though.

I don't like to eat when I'm not hungry and I find there's enough variation in blood sugar effect that if I just don't finish it doesn't mean I'm going to go low. That's one advantage of not eating high carb meals too, is the differences aren't that great ("the law of small numbers.").

So if I don't eat all I bolused for I just make sure to test enough to catch any low that occurs, and if I do go under 60 I treat with a couple glucose tabs.

Only 19 so the beer thing isn't going to happen anytime soon. Probably best to just drink some juice or something huh? Thanks.!:)

Juice is a good substitute for the plate you can't finish. But just a little will go a long way. I love the tiny cans of orange/pinapple mix and even grape juice.

Juice is exactly *not* the thing I'd recommend. I used to keep it on hand all the time but don't bother with it any more as it almost always blasts my BG through the roof. It really depends how much food you're leaving on your plate. I was thinking maybe a few bites of carby stuff might be around 10G. Juice usually runs about 30G/ serving a lot of the time, which is like 2 pieces of 15G/ carb bread. Getting that sort of thing precise is pretty important.

I agree that juice is likely to make you high. If your meal was only 19 carbs and you left say 1/4 of it that is only 5 carbs and chances our your blood sugar will still be in range. I would just test to make sure and not worry about it much.

When I was 19 years old and could not eat my dinner, juice was necessary to cover the insulin running around in my body. It's okay to drink some juice elizabeth, I'm still kicking to prove it :)

haha thanks!

I'd just have a cup of tea or coffee later (with a teaspoon of sugar in it) if I felt I was going low.

Jelly Beans or Skittles always work well for me since they are about 1 gram each.

Glucose tablets work for me when I feel too full but know I have to eat something to prevent a low.

If you do this a lot you can square wave your bolus and cancel at the end of the meal if you still have food on your plate...see how much was delivered and correct...but it's probably a little bit OCD for a young person.

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