Does anyone else think they need to attach the pod better to the adhesive???? I have had my omnipod for almost 2 weeks and i keep running into problems with the adhesive stretching from weight of pump and coming out or acting like its going to. And do you have better luck with iv prep pads or just plain alcohol wipes?

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Emily,

Where on your body are you placing the pod? I ask because there was a huge change for me when I started using my upper arms rather than my stomach. The pods on my stomach had a tendency to "stretch" but I don't think it was from weight. I think it was from the way I was sitting or sleeping, putting pressure on the pod from different angles.

Now that I use my arm, I very rarely have problems. Of course, it took me over six months of having the pods before I dared to use my arm -- since someone might see!?!?! I laugh now but that was a big step and, if I may say so myself, courageous.

Anyway . . . after just a few weeks on the pod, my diabetes educator gave me some IV prep pads to try and I loved them. It helps the pod adhere more securely and feel more comfortable.

Hope that helps . . .

Janet
Ive tried my arms. the first one i think i went to low and i got a huge bruise because i hit a vein and the other arm was fine until i was in the passenger side of a car and ripped it off on the doorway
Yeah, I should have mentioned that when I switched from my stomach to my arms that I had a lot of lows. Who knew that the placement would make such a difference? Wise people here, that's who. :)

It did take a little adjusting to get the pod in the right place on my arms. Even now, sometimes I say "darn it" (not exact quote) when I stick the pod on slightly wrong. Three days of living with that mistake.

There was a discussion about bruising here recently. It happens when you hit a capillary and it's bound to happen once in a while. One suggestion I read was to use ice on the area you're about to use for the pod to make the blood vessels shrink.

Honestly, it's trial and error until you find what works best for you. Hang in there because it's well worth it!
We had some issues when we first started, but almost none at all recently. This summer, Caleb has jumped into the pool a couple of times a little too hard and it has strained the pod as you describe. Every once in a while he rough houses and the same thing happens. But there are rare occurrences now.
At first we used IV Prep. But we quickly changed to just alcohol and found the adhesive to stick much better.
I find it sticks better on a flatter surface. There are certain spots on my belly that have more fat than others and the pod does not stay on as well. I like my backside, but need more insulin when I wear the pod there. I like that there is no tubing, but wish they would come up with something that had more flexibility at the infusion site so that the pod could move more naturally with my body or if I bang the pod against something the site does not come out.
I agree totally!! I'm realitively clumsy. I won't lie. I have run into doors and the pod has just fell off. I have recently took to taping the pods (with just some athletic tape) especially when it seems to come loose whether from running into things or from my clothes pulling on it when I take on or put them on. My most recent pods falls off were from my boyfriend tickling me (on my stomach) and the wave pool at Disney (it was on my arm but it was pretty loose at the time).

I agree with the lows...but mine happened when I switched from my arms to my stomach?...Even though my stomach had 4 years of abuse from Rapid D's. I also agree with the pain of when you put the pod in the wrong spot..and then it hurts for the entire 3 days...

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