I've narrowed down my choices to two, the medtronic paradigm and the one touch ping

My background: been a type 1 diabetic for 16 years and I had a medtronic pump about 14 years back for about a year. I loved the control I had when using the pump but w/o insurance, the supplies just got too expensive for my parents.

I work as a programmer all day long and one of the biggest things I want is to be able to bolus discreetly. I was really intrigued with the one touch ping's meter remote but after getting a demo from one of their reps, I saw the meter itself and it felt like i was downgrading my meter (I just recently switched to a verio IQ about 9 months back and have love love loved it!). After telling this to the rep, she told me that she heard that animas's next pump was going to most likely use the verio IQ (I took this with a grain of salt because I know she really wants me to commit though I hope this to be true).

Given that, if I want to keep using the verio IQ, the one touch ping's meter remote kinda loses it's advantage (reluctant to carry two meters around though it's not out of the question).

The minus with the one touch ping for me was the 200 unit reservoir. I currently consume about 80-100 units of insulin daily (40 lantus, 40-60 apidra as needed). Given that, it'd throw the cycle of changing equipment out of sync. Every 3 days for the infusion set (from what I was told) and about every 2 days for the reservoir. The paradigm has a 300 unit reservoir as you know which is signifcantly bigger. Has anyone been in a similar situation and if so, do you eventually get used to the changes being out of sync?

Otherwise, the rest of the features seem about the same for me. I do like the one touch ping being water proof but it's not a deal breaker. I figure if I can keep my cell phone dry, i can do the same with my pump.

cliff notes:

  • bout to get a new pump
  • one touch ping vs medtronic paradigm
  • not interested in the CGM
  • currently consume about 80-100 units of insulin a day (lantus + apidra)
  • really wanted the meter remote feature but don't like the one touch meter compared to my current verio IQ.

Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated! :)

Views: 502

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I chose the Medtronic for the larger reservoir. The funny thing is that after I started pumping my TDD dropped low enough that a Ping would work for me. Not saying that would be the case for you. I probably would have still chosen the MiniMed and I like the Contour Next link meter that came with it. Haven't used the Verio so I can't compare.

First of all please know you cannot go wrong. I really like my medtronic and would choose it again in a heart beat. Now i have never had the alternatives, but they are fine I am told and I would suggest talking to or trying both and then making the decision.

hmm i wonder if i can test drive them both. That would be a huge help. The one touch ping representative did tell me that when i start on the pump, they usually start me at 20% less insulin then my current daily intake. so that'd be roughly 64-80 units a day. If it's around 70, then I might be able to get away with a 3rd day.

I don't think the Paradigm is available any more as it's been replaced by the Revel pumps, at least in the USA, and the Veo, in more civilized, FDA-free countries.

The Revel isn't too much different but has some extra alerts w/ the CGM interface that can be handy. I think the Medtronics also have a meter remote option but I've never used it. I like Medtronic a lot but haven't ever played with the other flavors. You don't have to use the meter that comes with the pump, there's a "manual" mode that you can use to input the numbers without the "beaming" feature. When I first got my pump, I thought it was really cool and was sort of bummed to get the CGM, which= back to manual mode but now I don't even think anything of it. I know the Verio has data features. I had a One Touch Ultra Smart a few years ago that also had those but the Medtronic Carelink reports are pretty detailed and I've found them to be both tactically and strategically useful for working to beat up diabetes and recommend them too although, again, I haven't seen anything from the Pings. Good luck with your search!! If you can d/l manuals online, they might help evaluate using it but I've found those will have like 20 pages about changing sites vs. 10 pages on actually using the sucker. There's no substitute for going live!

I've been an off again on again pumper since I was first diagnosed T1 13 years ago. My previous two pumps were minimed (the REALLY old one and then the paradigm) and this time around I chose the Ping. As I already use the one touch ultra strips, the meter remote wasn't a difficult switch and I generally manyally use my dexcom readings anyway, so it's not like it would have been a big deal for me anyway.

Your doctor's office should have a diabetes educator who can set you up with saline trials of both of the pumps, so test driving is easy. One thing here, though, is you won't know how your body reacts to the actual infusion of insulin until you commit. This isn't an issue for everyone, but no matter which pump I picked I knew I was in for a long adjustment time as we searched for the right infusion set.

Short version:
- the manual input on the ping isn't irritating at all if you don't mind scrolling
- you should be able to try out all of the pumps with saline trials before hand so you can see if the smaller reservoir is actually a problem.

Unfortunately my insurance won't cover a session with the diabetes educator through my endo's office. They claim since they offer diabetes education they won't pay for the session :/

Then I would take the plunge and go with minimed. You can always load less than the reservoir fits if your insulin needs decreased.

I'm kind of leaning in that direction. For those in the knowing, if I currently take 40 units lantus and about 40-60 units apidra, what does that translate to roughly with a pump?

You often start with about a 25% reduction in basal, but it changes for everyone after you tweak doses. I was on 16 on shots and now am on 12, so that figure held. My I:C ratios didn't really change when I went on a pump. Also you must remember that everytime you prime you lose about 17-20 units.

While googling around, I came across this video which provided some more information:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2M0KeIqdYro

I think I'm going to go with the medtronic. Thank you all for the advice, every bit of it helped and it also helped just to write out my thoughts on the pumps. The reason I decided on the medtronic is:
bigger reservoir
looks like it's easier to debubble the reservoir
the option to be able to add the CGM as needed

I will miss not having it be water proof but since it'll be covered by a warranty, I'm sure I'll be able to adapt.

I am also a MM paradigm user. I love it. As far as discretion goes, I wear it in my pocket, can pull it out under a table, input a bolus, and back in the pocket. Testing the blood glucose is less discrete as far as I am concerned. The Carelink feature is also a helpful tool--you can download data from the pump to review or take to the doc.

It is easy to use, pretty self explanatory, and I have been happy with it. Check with your salesperson--you should get a MM pump coach and you get a certainn number of hours (I seem to remember 10) that you can contatc that person for assistance. With my first pump, that was an extraordinarily helpful part of the pump. I have also had good interactions with their telephone helpline.

Minimed is a great product. However, be weary of the customer service. See my previous posts for more information. My main concern after the initial cost would be if you have a balance for them for supplies.. they won't make payment arrangements with you unless it is over 300.00. That is the official policy at least. Who really wants to raise hell every time you call though. You may not have to worry about balances due though(depends on your individual situation). Animas from my dealings with them way better customer service. Alas, the reservoir is only 200 units.

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Diabetes Among Hispanics: We’re not all the same

US Hispanics are often portrayed in the press as a single, monolithic group. But anyone who has spent any time in San Francisco’s Mission District or the Bronx can tell you, we’re not all the same. Now we’re finding out Read on! →

Diabetes entre los hispanos: no somos todos iguales

Traducido por Mila Ferrer.    A menudo los Hispanos en Estados Unidos son retratados en la prensa como un solo grupo, monolítico. Pero cualquiera que haya pasado algún tiempo en el  Mission District de San Francisco o el Bronx se Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)


DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Bradford (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)

Gary (has type 2)

David (dns) (type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service