Hi all,

I would love to start using my thighs for a MM sensor insertion site. But I'm wondering how those of you who do make it work. I tried yesterday for the first time and didn't even make it the 10 minute waiting period before attaching the transmitter. Just walking around caused the sensor to fall out! I had placed it in my upper thigh close to my waist where I thought it would have the least movement issues.

So the questions are

Where specifically on the thigh do you put in the sensor so it stays in, even with normal movement in the legs

Are you taping it in any special way to get it to stay?

Do you tape it immediately, before attaching the transmitter, or do you find the adhesive in the sensor should stick for a few minutes.

Do you change your activity patterns to get it to work in your thighs?

Depending on where in the thigh you put it, like on your side towards the buttocks, do others help you get the sensor in, transmitter attached, and tape placed, or can you do it yourself somehow? If so, how?

Do those of you who have had success with thighs do aerobic exercise utilizing your legs? If so, how do you secure the sensor so it stays in place during workouts?

My oh-so scar-tissued abdomen thanks you very much for any advice!

Dave

Tags: insertion, sensor, tape, thigh

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Hi Dave,

I have been wearing the MM sensor in my thighs for almost 2 years now. I did it for real estate concerns as well.

Where specifically on the thigh do you put in the sensor so it stays in, even with normal movement in the legs? If sitting in a chair, I insert the sensor 3-4" from my leg crease. I get good results from putting the sensor right on top of my leg, but my 3 year old jumps on it and sits on it and can cause issues pain. I often insert slightly to the interior of my leg to avoid this.

Things to mention about location: You are aiming for fat tissue, make sure you have a little meat there. I have tried further down my leg and did not have enough fat. The sensor hurt like all get out as I believe it entered muscle tissue, it was also poorly reliable. Sometimes acitivites (bicycling) have an impact on the sensor, presumably from increase blood flow, etc. This causes the CGM to inaccuratly rise. I see this in about 10-15% of my senosors. Take into account your normal activities with your location (like my child jumping on the sensor) repeated contact may cause pain and inflamation that make results less reliable.

Are you taping it in any special way to get it to stay? I insert the sensor and let it wet for 20 minutes before attaching the transmitter. During this 20 minutes I do not tape the sensor, but I walk around very gingerly and have lost a sensor or two. I think this is the most dangerous time to lose a sensor. Also, watch out when you remove your pants to attach the transmitter. My waistband has pulled out a sensor.

Are you taping it in any special way to get it to stay? After attaching transmitter and starting a new sensor I tape the sensor. I use Opsite flexifix (http://www.smith-nephew.com/us/professional/products/all-products/o...) and apply tape covering the sensor and about 1/3rd of inch past the sensor.

Do you change your activity patterns to get it to work in your thighs? I don't change any of my plans or activity, but I am aware that the sensor may be less accuarte during intense leg activity. I also try to keep things from hitting it unnessecarily.

Depending on where in the thigh you put it, like on your side towards the buttocks, do others help you get the sensor in, transmitter attached, and tape placed, or can you do it yourself somehow? If so, how? Never asked for help, just some privacy.

Do those of you who have had success with thighs do aerobic exercise utilizing your legs? If so, how do you secure the sensor so it stays in place during workouts? The opsite flexifix tape works well for me and is often still usable on day 6. The tape has been less reliable when swimming. I have found that if water gets under the tape and around the sensor that the sensor's life will likely be shortened.

I use the Dexcom so I know the sensors are very different but I do use my thighs are the primary placement for them. I put them on the outside of the thigh, near the seam of pants, in the higher area. I've never changed any activity pattern, except maybe trying not to sleep on that side since lying on the sensor can affect the readings. I also do aerobic exercise with no problem. I hope you find something that works!

Hi Stacey,

Thanks for your thoughts. I did not know Dexcom sensors were that much different. How so?

I successfully inserted a new sensor into the upper part of my thigh this morning. So far, so good! I think the real test may be when I workout on my recumbent bike tomorrow. If it passes that test I may be home free!

Thanks to both of you for your replies.

Dave

Thanks, Capin. I'll try your tips/techniques this morning as I have to replace the ones that didn't work yesterday!

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