In the past four years since my son was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes (at 19) and changing doctors immediately because the first endo blamed it on him telling him he would be dead in 10 years-- he is not getting the full benefit out of all the pills he takes. His A1C is high enough that he stopped telling me what it was and he started Levimir this week. I think I am sick of everyone once again telling himself he gave himself diabetes. He has lost 50 lbs from his DX and has gotten worse. I also have come to the point that with all the wishing I had it instead of him and eating poorly to give it to me only made me unhealthy and still has not given the disease to me. I need to take care of me and finally let him manage himself. However after a long time he finally did agree to wear a medical ID (huge struggle). I found this guy who does artisan diabetes IDs with little garnets for drops of blood. The sterling silver is amazingly weighty
and he will make diabetes awareness jewelry, too. What I love is tells you three places that he will donate a good percentage of the price (American Diabetes we chose) so it just feels good. His site is here (although it seems like a plug it is not. It just says that when your child refuses to wear something for years, this got him to wear it)
http://www.tah-handcrafted-jewelry.com/
In the meantime I need to stop looking at my son as he sleeps after he has taken Levimir to make sure he is okay. It has been hard on us all. Happy Holidays and thanks for the support. I need it.

Views: 186

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

By the way once you get to his site go to Medical IDs. I also called him and he was creating it while I was on the phone and emailed me a couple possible designs. Great guy.

Has you, your son and/ or his doctors explored the possibility that he's T1 rather than T2? Not that there's anything wrong with losing some weight if it's there to lose but diabetes is not really a good way to do that! I lost 30 lbs when I was dx'ed (1984) but only weighed 150 to start with so it was pretty clearly not healthy. That particular misdiagnosis scenario is not exactly uncommon and insulin can help a lot of his BG is wildly uncontrolled to the point where he's continuing to lose weight. It seems like his doc(s) may be endorks so a misdiagnosis may at least partially explain the ongoing problems.

I didn't wear anything for years but ended up getting a guitar pick thing when I started running longer distances, figuring it would be handy if I ended up in a ditch.

I'm with AR on this one if you research this site a bit and look at the forums for LADA you may find some cases that are remarkably similar to his. But you're also right, this site is called TuD nor SuD because Erez has D not you and he does need to manage D himself. It is a lifelong commitment, but no one can make him commit, he has to do that himself.

I had the same exact thought as the others when I read your post. The fact that he lost weight at diagnosis and his numbers keep going up on pills and he needs insulin after only four years makes me also consider LADA which is a slower onset form of Type 1 that happens in adults. Out of touch doctors (most of them!) often diagnosis based simply on age, though your son was young enough at diagnosis that's hard to fathom! He should get a full panel of antibody tests to determine his type.

Good for you on letting go, I know that's hard for moms.

I agree with what everyone else has said. If he is diagnosed as T2 at such a young age it is unusal although possible. Having lost 50 lbs after diagnosis if he were T2 his D should have gotten better not worse.

He must have been a big guy to start with if he had 50 lbs to loose. Is this a case where the doctors are blinded by the T2 epidemic. Where they can't see the forrest for the trees.

You are correct in letting your 23 yo son take care of his own diabetes care. You can support him like we do you, but let him do all of the tasks necessary to deal with D. He did not give it to himself. You are being foolish eating poorly trying to get D. That is not the way most people get it. Eat healthy and be a good example for your son. Try another endo and have him tested for LADA (adult T1), like the other people have said.

Everyone has helped me so much to open my eyes about LADA. I am going to the endo tomorrow to ask her about it. Thank you so much...really no words. When he lost weight it got worse, not better. His 5.0 A1C shot up and with the multitude of pills he got on he saw little benefit. How can I learn about LADA?

Renee, just go on the Type 1.5, LADA forum here which you will find under the forum tab above, and ask a question, or search through the discussions and see what comes up.

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

Meet The 2014 Big Blue Test Grant Recipients

  This year Diabetes Hands Foundation has pledged US$35,000 in Big Blue Test grants, continuing its support for programs aimed at providing lifesaving supplies, medical tests, treatment, and patient education to people living in need who have or at risk Read on! →

Kim Vlasnik: The Patient Voice

  Kim Vlasnik, you NAILED it! In this video, Kim Vlasnik takes our breath away as she describes what its like to be a person with diabetes. Fortunately, Stanford’s Medicine-X Conference gives ePatients, like Kim, a chance to speak since we carry the Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 1)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service