Ok I'm not that new to diabetes more new to taking it seriously after having to go on insulin. Now I've tried my own GP but have a condition (M.E.) that makes them dismiss any symptom I may present. (don't believe me look into some of the political wrangling round this issue)
Anyway when my bloods are in a normal range (UK measurement between 5-9) I start to lose the central section of my vision I can actually measure the level of my bloods by how much I can see at 9 there is a light blue haze annoying but manageable, by the time it gets to 5 I am totally blind the centre of my vision being replaced by what looks like a blue silhouette of a particularly frayed ball of wool.
I was referred by the hospitals diabetic clinic for a full diabetic eye exam who could find nothing unusual then back to my GP who just about washed his hands of the affair and diverts me any time I try to bring up the topic.
I've tried searching the web and read about blurred vision with high sugars and sudden drops in sugar but nothing about continual vision impairment when at normal sugar levels. It's leading to me keeping my sugars higher then they should be just so I can continue to read.

Sorry a little more rambling than intended.

Tags: blind, eyes, vision

Views: 277

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Not sure what you're seeing or what is going on with your vision. But I was told, (and it turned out to be true) that if your blood sugar is high for a long time, you will not feel normal when it's in the normal range. It took almost two years for my vision to stablize since getting my bgs under control.

I think the best thing you can do for yourself and your vision is to aim for sustained, tighter control and you will begin to feel better.

Hope that helps.

If you have been to a specialist and they say nothing is wrong you are very fortunate and want to keep it that way. That is not the case for me. As Kelly says, it does take a while for everything to stablize once you get your numbers into a normal range. By that, I mean normal. Not "acceptable for a diabetic" range. Your body is made to operate within a certain range of BG. Anything above or be,ow that range is problematic and can result in damage. Staying in that range is our biggest challenge and reward all rolled into one. Some are more successful than others but the goal and the gain are the same no matter what. Also, I have noticed that there is a rubber band or wave affect to my BG swings. If I run too high for too long one day I feel the results (primarily with my vision)24 to 48 hours later. You might be seeing some of that as well. It took me a while to recognize this wave like pattern. Trust me, I understand your frustration with your eyesight, but keeping high numbers is like using your credit card for gas and groceries. At some point the bill comes due, but the goods are long gone.

What are your BG levels on average? Is the 5-9 (my docs told me 4-8 btw) normal for you?

When my BG was high (it reached 27) I virtually lost my vision. It took over a week of 4-8 sugars until I could see properly, but over 2 months before I could get new glasses.

When I first went on insulin I used to get blue floating halos in the mornings (mainly when I was showering)...

When I was first diagnosed with Diabetes and went on insulin for the first time for the next few days I had blurry vision. Blurry to the point that I couldn't read things, I had to have my mom read my books to me while I was in the hospital. The doctors told me that was a normal symptom when your body suddenly gets normalized with insulin that it's been lacking for a long period of time. I would talk to your doctor. Your body might need a few days to completely normalize itself and adjust to the insulin.

I think it mostly has to do with your body getting used to the status quo. Might just take some time at normal levels for your eyes to figure out what's going on. The capillaries in your eyes are some of the most delicate blood vessels in the body, so they can be very sensitive to blood sugar.

When I was first diagnosed (~10 years ago), I spent a week in the hospital coming out of DKA and learning insulin. The week after that my vision went nuts - everything was blurry and I pretty much only had distance vision. It was super scary, and I walked into my fair share of walls before things started to even out and went mostly back to normal. I still need reading glasses now, especially if I've been high a lot recently.

I too get what you're saying. If I'm asleep and wake up and see that bluish haze I know I'm going low without testing. I've developed this for quite a few years, can't remember how many years now. At times I do have hypounawareness meaning I can't feel symptoms of lows. The medical profession here in the U.S. don't have answers for all our problems...so you're not alone there are things that are unexplainable. I've had this disease for 53 years and nothing really surprises me any more.

we are a bit different. I know when my sugar levels are high I get the eye issues as well, sweats, shakiness, fast heart rate and palputations. When I get low like tonight which really isn't low 124 sometimes the same thing happens and joint pains as well. we all handle the symptoms the same way. make sure you get checked for glaucoma which is common with diabetes or side effects of any meds you are on. Check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels as this could also effect the eyes. This is just my opinion of what ive been goin through. the body likes structure if anything changes it does the same..good luck

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

DHF receives $200,000 grant from Novo Nordisk

Grant given to support programs aimed at bringing together people touched by diabetes for positive change BERKELEY, CA: December 4, 2014 – Diabetes Hands Foundation (DHF) has received a grant of US$200,000 from Novo Nordisk to support programs aimed at Read on! →

Guest Post: World Diabetes Day 2014 on Twitter… sifting through the data

At Symplur we track hashtags, keywords, user accounts, and pretty much anything else on Twitter that has to do with healthcare. We collect the data and then build countless ways to slice it up so that we’re able to better Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service