Hi I was wondering do you eat you meals at the same time everyday? or do you eat when your blood sugar is at a certain level? Is there ever a level where your blood sugars at that you feel is too low to take your insulin when it's time to eat? if this does happen do you eat first then take it instead of the usual before then eat? Sorry for all the questions. I just picked up my insulin an hour ago and I don't know if I should start it today or wait until tomorrow.. I was prescribed Novolog before meals and Levemir 6units at bedtime.

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If my blood sugar is below 80 I might start eating before I inject. I don't eat at the same time every day but try to wait at least 4 hrs between meals. If I'm high I will wait until my BG comes down tho. I don't know your history but I don't think you should wait to start your insulin.

When I was on injections, before the pump:

I was wondering do you eat you meals at the same time everyday?
A. Yes, because I would have a reaction if I delayed the meal.
or do you eat when your blood sugar is at a certain level?
A. I always took a snack if my BG was low.
Is there ever a level where your blood sugars at that you feel is too low to take your insulin when it's time to eat? if this does happen do you eat first then take it instead of the usual before then eat?
A. There were times when I ate for a few minutes and then took the insulin. However, I tried to be careful to account for the low bg and not overdose.

Sorry for all the questions. I just picked up my insulin an hour ago and I don't know if I should start it today or wait until tomorrow..
A. If it were me, and I can't answer for you, I would take the insulin as prescribed, checking bg every 2 to 3 hours for the first 24 hours. Perhaps set the alarm every 3 hours the first night, if possible. Do you live with someone who can check on you during the night? On the other hand, there should be no harm in waiting until the morning, unless your bg is high and needs the insulin to bring it down. These are just my opinions and I am NOT a model diabetic.

I'm still fairly old school or maybe habit is just hard to break. I eat breakfast the same time Monday thru Friday, lunch and dinner are at the same time every day as well although it can vary by 15-20 minutes either way. Weekend schedule is pretty much the same although it's pushed about an hour or so lagter as I do like to sleep in a bit.

I would think about eating a bit first before bolusing and depending on how low either correct first or cut back the bolus to account for a low.

My mealtimes vary but generally are about 5 hours apart. If I am low before a meal I will usually go ahead and eat (without correcting) and then test after the meal until my blood sugar comes up enough to bolus. If I'm high I will correct and try and stall my meal, or else just include my correction with my carb bolus.

Your Novolog will take 10 to 15 minutes before it begins working. If you are low I would say 80 or below just inject with your meal. I agreed that you need to start your insulin and check often for the first few days. Don't be afraid, be prepared. Have fast acting glucose with you at all times. You will get the hang of it!

My first injection will be my bedtime one, so I guess I can just wake up every 3 hours like Nell said to be safe. The doctor said she was starting me out really low to try to prevent lows so hopefully she's right.

The real question is why were you able to get an insulin prescription without really knowing how to use it ? You should never be sorry about asking questions that's pretty much why we're all here.
No I don't eat my meals at the same time every day, and in fact some days, if I am not hungry I don't eat a meal at all. If I am hungry I'll check my bg, take whatever insulin I need to cover the meal and eat.

Well I was on insulin when I was pregnant but it was mixed insulin it was different. I have no insulin since not pregnant anymore and my diabetes never were away they said I have 1.5 lada I have been trying to get help for the past 9 months and kept getting turned down by the government, I can't afford insurance. So finally found out about this place called shepherds hope..I was able to see a doctor but they are all volunteers so I don't have a phone number etc. for the doctor I have to wait a month and go back to that clinic and wait in the long line just to be seen.It's better then no help at all which is what i've had the past 9 months and the diabetes has gotten so bad I eat no carbs and still go high and pretty much stay high. So im very thankful they have prescribed me the insulin.I'm just scared because it's different from taking the mixed that i did before. I'm just trying to learn the most I can.

Very few of us actually get useful advice from our prescribing physicians. So many just prescribe set doses or sliding scales and it's on us to figure it all out. Even people with insurance are not guaranteed good up to date and complete advice. Scary, isn't it? But with the help of each other and books like Using Insulin, and plain old trial and error, we figure it out.

I agree with everything you said, Zoe. I know of so many newly diagnosed diabetics who have had a prescription of insulin written for them, given sliding scale/set doses, and out the door with no more information. Almost like it was when I was diagnosed in 1968.And we did not even have sliding scale then, no way to test , just one shot a day and hope you do not spill ketones in your urine. That was it. The only difference was that my medical team( GP, dieticians, endo) gave me all the info they had at the time. Sad and scary that we have so much more info and better techniques to care for type one, and the type of education given is basically the same as 43 years ago.

Get the books from the library ,denise Using Insulin and think like a Pancreas and stay with us for support at Tudiabetes. You will get the hang of it, like Zoe said, with adequate information and "trial and error": You will figure it out.

God bless,
Brunetta

I am not at all putting down the lovely volunteer doctors at shepherd's hope. As Zoe said, even those of us with insurance are not guaranteed up to date info and care.

God bless,
Brunetta

I usually eat when I want to. A lot of times other stuff (driving to work, running, weekend activities...) dictates when I can get the food in or whatever. If my BG is below 70, sometimes I'll treat the low w/ 15g of carbs and then bolus as if my BG were 70 and eat and it kind of smooths out but I have a CGM to sort of watch for emergencies and that might be risky?

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