Wearing a tight dress this weekend....can I disconnect from my pump for the night?

Hi everyone, I'm super new to this website and this is my first question I'd really love help firguring out! I'm going out this weekend and will be wearing a beautiful (and very tight) dress with NOWHERE to hide my Paradigm Insulin Pump without it throwing off the aesthetic. I'm wandering if it is okay to disconenct for the night and have my back up plan with me (like my flexpen?)

Have any ladies out here encountered this issue before? What did you do to resolve it? I really don't wanna wear it for the night, I just don't know if that is actually possible or if I have to suck it up and suck it in!

Thank you so much!

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Well, you could, but trying to keep your blood sugars from going through the roof (by taking frequent boluses) might ruin your evening! You could do a basal/bolus thing but you'd have to start preparing for that 24 hours ahead.

What about one of those thigh things the pump attaches to (Does Spibelt sell them?) Or putting it in your bra?

I have a thigh cuff I use for dresses.

But yes - you can disconnect - but like Zoe said - you may need to plan prior to start - if you want to do a basal (Lantus/Levemir)Bolus plan. Or you could potentially do injections of your rapid insulin every couple of hours to cover both your basal rate and your carbs.

Idea 1: Is it the kind of outfit where you could add some kind of pin-on bow, ribbon cluster, silk flower, etc. at the waist to camouflage it?

Idea 2: Could you tuck it into the back of of a pair of spanx, in the small of your back?

Idea 3: Could you clip it to your bra strap and pin a corsage over the outside of your dress to hide it?

Being a member of the I.B.T club :"Itty bitty **tty club, I am friends with Vicotria's secret "Very sexy" padded bras. for tight or cleavage baring dresses I put my paradigm pump in a little baby sock. Then.;with a little safety pin, I attach the sock -lothed pump inside the padded part near the arm pit.. Voila!!i
The pump does not show!. I have done this with all sorts of sun dresses and tight little thingies. Never shows and I can slide it out in the bathroom for a bolus, if necessarry. It may work for you, too.

God Bless
Brunetta

P.S> Was that too much information?

I'm starting to think that you girls need to wear more clothes!

LOL

Don't you get cold?

(Just kidding, of course. If you've got it, put it in a sundress while you can!)

aww lol this dress is very respectable and womanly, it's just tight!And I completely agree, while I've got a great body I'm going to enjoy it---just like I enjoy a stiletto (the higher the better) :)

unfortuantely this dress is a no bra and no spanks kind of dress! it's super body-consious and I can't even wear spanx with it.

Thank you everyone with all your suggestions! I will have to go and play around with the dress. If it comes down to it, I think I can just disconnect for a naight and somehow (fingers crossed) be ok!

You can take it off an will be fine!!
I have recently gone off the pump for this reason that I was taking it off every saturday night and a few times a week!! bu for most of the time i would have no trouble with it.
I have not the best control at the moment but when i started taking it off i would make sure i had a fairly good reading when i took it off i also took it with me and kept the site in but it you want the site off that can also work i felt better having my pump with me but not on! you will feel a little funny about it and prob do more readings than you would normally do.
If you feel you have the control over your diabetes and have an idea what will happen with it go for it just remember to put it back on at the end of the night!!

good luck and rock that dress!

thank you for the advice, I think I'll end up having the pump with me just not on me incase I feel wierd about it. Funny how I was concerned about feeling wierd with it on, now I feel wierd being detached from it. Still getting used to being a diabetic and all of the new challenges it creates that were not there before!

Dunno if this will work for you (everyone is different), but think about it.

My teenage son is a water-nut, but won't go to the beach openly wearing his pump. So we move the infusion site somewhere under his trunks (the side of the tush is a great spot) and then bring the pump with us. He disconnects when he hits the beach. About once every hour or so, I drag him back to "camp", feed him a few light carbs, test his BG, and then "bolus" his missed basal. Then we detach from the pump and he disappears with his friends again. No muss/no fuss, and it takes all of 60 seconds. We have never had a "high" doing this, and we've gone better than 16 hours at a stretch several times.

Maybe this strategy will work for you? If not, there is always the Lantus/Levamir option... :)

And I'll echo Mishy's comment: ROCK THE DRESS!!!

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