Hi everyone. I used Medtronic Real Time CGM products with my insulin pump, and while I liked the info I was getting, the stress my skin and body went through with those insertions was too crazy! Awful reaction to them, needle and adhesive alike.

I would hope there is a way to get them somewhere to a place where they can be legally redistributed... do you know anything? Otherwise I will take them to my Endo to give to her other patients. I know they are expensive!

Tags: CGM, Medtronic, donation, sensors, transmitters

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Take them to your endro or try to return to medtronic. I used the CGM for 72 hours, did not have the skin problem but really, how many insertion sites can one person tolerate if they are still out in the world? Engineering with the real person in mind would go a long way to selling the system - I may be an animal but I'm not a pin cushion.

Ouch! I have been considering the cgm to help me get my bg under better control, but this doesn't sound great, given the fact that I find myself asking my regular infusion set needle to "please not hurt this time" every time I insert it :(.

The sensors can not be resold by MM or given out by your Dr. To much risk.

You could offer to give them to someone who may not have insurance. I am sure that someone who could not otherwise afford them would be very grateful.
I really struggled with the Medtronic CGM and had lots of bruising and pain. I always used the inserter. I've been using Dexcom for several years and don't have that problem although I still wince when I insert it. Dexcom is more similar to a manual insertion.

Looking back, I wonder if I would have had more success inserting the sensor manually with Medtronic. The reason I say that is I did very well with the manual insertion of Silhouette infusion sets (now is a Comfort infusion set because I'm with Animas), but have pain and bruising when I use the Inset30 which has a built-in inserter.

So manual insertion might be worth a try. That won't help with reactions to the adhesive though. Kerri at SixUntilMe.com found that spraying an asthma inhaler on her skin before inserting a Dexcom sensor took care of her terrible skin reactions.

To answer your question, your CGM is a prescription device and it's illegal to sell or give it to someone else. But I doubt you'll be caught if you give it to someone else. But I wonder about the liability if that person has a negative event our even dies while using it...

Good luck!

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