This is a total "I'm just curious" question, but for type 1s on the pump, what is the MAX basal rate you require at any given time throughout the day. I'm a petite woman (about 130 lbs, in great shape/health other than this lazy pancreas thing, generally pretty insulin-sensitive) and, for the most part, rarely require a basal rate above 0.4 u/H. However, there's a period in the middle of my day on days when I'm at work (about 4 hours or so) where I need to up my basal rate to 0.7 u/H and sometimes even higher!!  Sometimes I'll have it set at 0.7 and have to still do a temp basal increase to fight off numbers in the mid-200s or higher. I am pretty certain this is mostly due to general stress that comes with any job, as the pattern is VERY predictable and only occurs on days that I'm in the office. Having a basal rate even close to 1 u/H seems absurd, but it got me thinking about what some other people use for basal rates. 

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This was quite interesting to read. Mine vary from 0.56 to 0.9, lower if I am at work because its a very active job.

I like that question! Because I was interested in asking it too ...

I'm a real nerd about this (I'm an aerospace engineer) and I have a neat Graph of my basal rates (see attached at the link below):

I have 4 profiles with multiple rates thru-out the day. I gave them "names" in my pump to remind me which one to select. Read them for yourself; they're self-explanatory.

The number by the name is the total amount (Units) for that program for a day.

The graph axis is U/hr.

I also put a BG chart on the basal rates graph so when I am tuning my basal rates I can plot my BG's there and see the effect the basal has ... but I haven't revised these rates very much in the last 4 months at all.  I've been on the pump for 6 months and I spent a lot of effort in the first 2 months setting these rates.  Thankfully they've held steady lately.  No doubt, though, I will change them as they evolve in the future.

I need a lot in the a.m. just when I get out of bed; in fact I always take a 2-Unit Bolus upon waking. How many other folks out there do that too?

Max rate is 0.975 U/hr for my “slob” profile

TG

Attachments:

which program gives you this graph. I started pumping 1 month ago and never downloaded any info from my pump. Will like to do that at least to have visual trend like you have

oops! replied twice! sorry!

Who knows how I can delete this extra reply? TG

there should be a little x in the right hand corner.

Max basal is 2.45 to combat DP. Min basal is 1.45 during the day. 6' 210 lbs.

I'm an absurd 1.1 u/hr basal - Type 1 for 38 yrs but pump for the last 1.5 yrs; 5'10 180lbs.

I guess bolus is huge. 1.8 in the morn, 1.9 in the afternoon

i'm 5'9". 176 lbs.

show me your figure is not meant to be an empirical war or some sort of shame-on- to-you kinda thing. I think it gives each of us some perspective and may help us improve in some ways. 2 bodies are not same, as long as you are trying to take care of your DB, everyone should be fine. Coming out of Africa and haven traveled around a bit, i know there are millions from our species who are TB1 and have never heard the word INSULIN talk less Bolus or Basal. Funny or unfortunate as it may sound, in some part of the world they still use Bitter Leaf or anything bitter as a "cure" for DB, i know of some people who are told to drink their urine.
So, dont freak out as you will be fine...I know.

I have a crazy variation: 0.8 u/hr in the afternoon, when I am most sensitive, and a whopping 3.25 u/hr at night to deal with dawn phenomenon. My current basal program has 6 different rates now, ramping it up and down at different times of the day.

I'm 6'0, 175 lbs. Clearly there is some insulin resistance. I plan to discuss with my endo. at my next visit.

1.0 at 3:00am and at 11:00am it starts dropping and is .7 at 12am.

I am 5' 10 and 165 lbs. My basal rate on my standard profile ranges from .95 in the early morning hours before I awake to combat the DP and Am resistance, and I use .65 for most of the day and .75 at night. I also have a sick or "inactive" day basal. This basal is for when I am sitting at the computer all day, or when I (rarely) have a cold or virus: It is .85 all day and .90 at night, with a 1.1 pre dawn basal.
I will have to adjust the first mentioned standard basal, as I seem to be getting too much insulin in the afternoons and evening.

God bless,
Brunetta

I do use a temporary basal rate reduction (20% lower) when I know I will be walking around a lot shopping, or hiking; setting it about an hour before to avoid lows.

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