Dexcom just wrote that they are sending me a new starter kit (which includes receiver and transmitter) as my old one is a year old and is not covered by warranty. My question is, what do you friends do with the old one when you get the new. My present one is in perfect working order.

Tags: dexcom, kit, new, warranty

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I don't order a new one until the old one stops working. They usually last 18 months.

Dexcom said warranty stops at 1 year. The new one came yesterday. I do not intend to start using it as nothing is wrong with what i have at present. I bet there are millions of diabetics who need this piece of equipment but who cant afford/get it. Here am i with 3 boxes of the consumable and a new starter kit.

Keep the old one as a spare in case of breakage and while awaiting a new component.

+1

I just got a new one this week, my old Dexcom was 3 or 4 years old! I'd suggest you look for a place to donate the old one. Alternatively hang on to it because you'll have a backup charger cable for work.

I'd hoped this model would have some changes, the only one was the software went from 7.0.8 to. 7.0.9. I look forward to the new Dexcom model whenever that arrives.

I just spent over $1500 for a new Dexcom after my old one quit working. I wish for that $1500 Dexcom would have made some significant changes like allowing people to take Tylenol without frying the sensors. My old Dexcom was almost 2 years old.

I was offered a new unit about 1 month ago and I declined.. Here's why.
- My original Unit was sent to me March 2011 and was replaced under warranty in December 2011. When the Pumps-It rep called me to tell me to get a new one I first asked what is different about the new one. "Nothing" I then said that my unit was replaced under warranty in December, shouldn't that unit be under warranty for 1 year? Answer " No the warranty id only for the original unit for 1 year!"
This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard! They just want to keep taking advantage of those of us who have either the $ to pay for these units or the Insurance that will pay for these units and replace them unnecessarily.
With all do respect to those who have more than one unit, why in the world would you need it? Once your unit goes out your insurance will pick up another one.. This overselling and taking advantage of good insurance plans only supports the outrageous cost associated to having these units. Thus those that have lesser insurance plans will continue not to cover these devices based upon the exuberant costs.
Lastly (before I hop off my soap box) I nailed Pumps it about charging over Dexicom's listed MSRP to my insurance company for the sensors. Again trying to maximize their profits at the cost of my insurance.
These devices are great IMO and I'm fortunate enough to have a good insurance and the means to pay for these types of items. That said, there are others likely in more need of such a device than I am so lets help those less fortunate out. Doesn't mean you have to give them yours, but reducing the costs associated to such care will ultimately make it more pallatable for lesser levels of Health insurance to start approving it.

Thanks for taking time out to write your thought. My situation is somewhat similar to yours; I got a replacement around Sept 2011 and now i have a new unit. I now know better and will refuse a new one when they come pandering next year. Thank you.

I travel a lot. I always have 2 as well as 2 PDM's for my Omnipod. I started this when we went abroad for vacation.

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