Will the Cannula on the Silhouette kink if the angle is too sharp?

I have yet another question. I know, I know, I never stop with the incessant questioning. But inquiring minds want to know--you know?
I just got some Silhouette samples from Medtronics and installed the first one manually, because, well quite frankly, the look and the feel of the Sil-Serter scared me to death. My question is this; How do you know how much of an angle is best when installing it manually? It has the little see through window on it and it appears to be angling downward somewhat, but I don't think its kinked. I'm assuming you just have to get used to it. Guess I'll know in 3 or 4 hours if I got it right.
It was easy though, and painless. Although I know sooner or later I'll stick one of those places that is anything but pain free. Is the Silhouette a good choice? I did read all the discussion I could find on the Silhouette. From what I can gather, it was actually designed for those who are fortunate enough to be thin, thus the angled cannula. I'm not that fortunate. I wanted to try it though, because of the length of the cannula. The Sure-T is only 6mm--This particular Silhouette is 17mm. I think that's like a mile and a half. Of course, it was designed for children. So is the Silhouette a good choice for those of us with "love handles?"
I also noticed when I primed the tubing that the insulin just came flowing out. I have never seen it do that with the Quick-Set or the Sure-T. I was sort of shocked at how fast the insulin came out.
OK, well that's it for now until the ever-running wheels in my mind think of something else.

Tags: Cannula, Sil-Serter, Silhouette

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Hi again Bobby and I think it is great you ask questions...
I use the short Silhouette 6mm for my legs and the angle for me is very shallow. But I have used the ones you have when I was at my ideal weight and a downward bend never presented me with issues. I do slow insertion of Silhouette's because what I have noticed they bend easy if there is resistance and by putting it in slow myself I can feel resistance.

I would say if you don't feel resistance and it is painless as you said it is probably in a good place and position. It also depends I have noticed on where and if the Silhouette has been placed in horizontally or vertical. For instance when I used Silhouette's in my stomach or hips they are placed horizontally however on my legs never only vertical.

This is a YMMV thing though so your trial an error will probably give you the most accurate information for you.

Be well and be loved
Two things:

1. If the tubing primed quickly - as in almost immediately- or squirted insulin AND you're using a Minimed Pump - call customer service. That's a symptom of an impending pump malfunction.

2. The Silhouette - I use it in my rump and alternated it with the Quickset which I use in my Abdomen. The canula CAN bend, but I can't say that it's due to the angle of insertion, scar tissue, movement or other factors. My guess is "Yes" and that inserting at too steep an angle will result in a bent cannula. For instance, the Quickset cannula will bend if inserted in a shallow area.

I was taught to insert it at a 30 degree angle, which is pretty easy to approximate. You can probably examine the Sil-Serter to get a good approximation of the proper angle. I insert it manually.

I think if you've got enough room, or some nice love handles, you're not likely to run into bent cannulas very often.

The reason I use two types of sets is to allow me to rotate sites to more areas. I'm pretty thin and the Quicksets don't work well on my rump but work fine on my abdomen. The Sils are perfect for my 'below the belt' sites.

Good luck,

Terry
Bobby did you rewind the pump before sticking in the new reservoir? I am asking cause I forgot once and insulin shot out as I tried to make the reservoir fit :P silly me I have silly moments like that from time to time.
Be loved
Yes, I did rewind the pump, and the insulin didn't exactly shoot out, it was just dripping really quick. Always before, it forms a drop fairly slowly. I don't know, right now its working perfectly and my blood sugar is 105, so I'll wait until I change the site again and pay close attention to how fast the insulin comes out.
Thanks ya'll for helping.
Peace out,
Bobby
I'm not skinny and I use & love the Silhouettes. I started pumping with Quick-Sets but started having too many problems with bent cannulas, No Delivery alarms, high BGs etc. I started using the 17mm Sils 3 years ago and switched to the 13mm when they came out. I think the literature says to insert at around a 30 degree angle but some people go in at a more shallow angle and some a little deeper. It probably will kink if you use too great an angle, but I've had very few problems.
Thanks Liz,
In just one day, so far I have been impressed. My blood sugar is exactly where it needs to be. Of course, for the last week I've been battling Bronchitis, so that hasn't helped. Its time for me to reorder my sets, and I've got to figure out if this is what I want. A couple more days. Right now I'm leaning toward the Silhouette. Oh by the way, do you install them manually? I have played with this Sil-Serter, and I really have to push hard on the button on the end to get it to release. No matter how I try it, its just not easy. But when I put it in by hand, it was just as easy as installing the Sure-T. Never a dull moment in a day in the life of a Diabetic.
When I first started I use the Serter and it worked okay. After a couple of weeks it jammed and I was forced to insert manually and I never went back to the serter. Every once in awhile I do experience pain when I insert but if it really hurts when I first puncture the skin, I just pull it out and move to another spot. I've found that when it really hurts on the first poke, the set will hurt the whole time it's in.
Liz,
Do you install the Silhouette sideways or length ways with the tubing pointing down? Or does it matter?
Bobby,
I believe the Quick-Set might be the best choice for you. I use it and it works beautifully. The Quick-Set inserter isn't very scary at all. I believe the Quick-Set was designed for average to slightly plump people. I think I fit that category well.
Thanks Kevin,
I actually started out using the Quick-Sets, and for some reason I had absorption problems. I don't know if the cannuals were getting kinked, plugged up or what. When I went to the Sure-T I have pretty good luck. Only two things I don't like about it: The needle only comes in one length--6mm, and the tubing only comes in one length--short. I am currently trying the Silhouette, and so far my BG's are down where there supposed to be after my bout with Bronchitis. I am having some difficulty getting the angle correct though, and the needle is like a foot and a half long! Well, ok its 17mm, but its long. I wish there was something like the Quick-Set with a 9mm needle instead of the cannula.
Bobby,

There is a Silhouette that's shorter, only 13mm. Those 4mm really do make a difference! The Silhouette tubing can be used with the Sure-Ts so you can always switch between the two sets if you'd like to use both. I use the same tubing & reservoir until it's empty and I've switched between a Sure-T and a Silhouette without having to change the tubing.

When you insert the Sil, you can do the first poke at a deep angle just to get it in, then pull back slightly, adjust the angle and push it all the way in.

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