Simple word (unless someone can show me how to do a poll here) (:::Z

Yes or No... do you BELIEVE there will be a cure within your lifetime?!!? I'll start.

NO


Too much money in keeping us diabetics... maintianing us....
Stuart

Tags: cure, in, lifetime, poll, your

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That is a scary thought - and at the same time, almost a typical human story...we can conquer disease, but we can't conquer our greed...

We can only hope that that is not the case - and, of course, always continue asking for questions on how the search for a cure is going. As noted, the diabetes patients are largely alone on this - the higher-ups are looking at the money. It really has to be us to continue advocating and demanding for a cure.

I honestly think we will never see a cure for diabetes. If you look at it, diabetes is a money maker for the drug companies and companies that supply items for diabetes. If they find a cure many people will be left with out a job and will lose money. I was told by my finacial advisor to invest money in drug companies.

in 1970 a bottle of insulin was $4 ( about what an average persons hourly wage was) today insulin that is made synthetically and is much safer because of less risk from animal contamination (this means that drug companies insurance cost is lower) and should mean lower cost to produce is now $150 ( a 8 hour days wage at 18.75 per hour...) you better believe drug companies have everything to loose if there is a cure.. and test strips at $1 each... gouge...!!!!!

i agree, the amount of money ive spent in my life time is enough to get a house, there is no way prescription companies would alow the FDA to approve a drug that cures diabetes, its a life long paycheque.

I believe the organizations that make money off us would rather not see a way out for us but I don't know if they have the ability to stop progress. Most people with diabetes do have insurance so the insurance companies are paying the majority of the money for supplies so you'd think they'd be for a cure or better treatment. Think about it, if most people had to pay out of pocket for their supplies the first thing people would give up if they can't afford is test strips. You can live without testing but you can't live without insulin. I buy my insulin in Canada for a 1/3rd of the cost here in the US. I think a non invasive meter is very realistic and not to far away from reality and if just one of them breaks the stick business will be gone. The main reason diabetes is so profitable is because so many people have it and at least type 1's have it the majority of their lives. If a cure was found for type 1's the type 2's would still keep big pharma more then happy. If I found out that a cure was realized but it is shelved due to loss of profit I would literally buy a machine gun and kill whomever was behind it. You'd see it on prime time news, trust me.

gary... i'd help you...!
being completely hypoglycemic unaware, i have to test 8-10 times a day.. my first warning sign of low blood sugar is when my heart stops beating and i stop breathing... i don't have a choice about testing often...why aren't the insurance companies lobbying for a cure... why isn't medicare and medicaid lobbying..the diabetes suppliers and pharmaceutical companies are certainly stuffing dollars into our government officials pockets...!

NO

and don't forget how many people are earning salaries working for entities that are supposedly searching for a cure.

So the impression I get from the non believers is that the "cure" thing is nothing more then a scam and that all these groups that solicit money know dam well they aren't bringing a therapy to commercialization even if one did exist. If that be the truth then our its own fault for letting these organizations exist. If everyone stopped donating they'd all eventually run out of money. I really only support Dr Faustman anymore but there still is no way to know how legit she is nor what her true motive is. She seems trustworthy to me but then again the JDRF sounds sincere as well. Unfortunately I can't cure my own disease otherwise I'd just everyone else pretending to go F*** themselves.

Well, I don't believe there is going to be a cure in MY lifetime, but I'm 64, and don't have THAT many years to go. But the real reason is that they still don't have all the basic scientific knowledge that is necessary for a cure, and it takes time to accumulate knowledge. There also has to be a little serendipity and probably a lot of technology. And don't forget the funding part.

I absolutely do NOT believe there is a conspiracy to prevent or suppress a cure, but I AM scientifically sophisticated enough to know how difficult it will be -- sending a man to the moon was peanuts in comparison.

Natalie, Check out Viacyte.com. They are working with encapsulated StemCells which they can grow by the billions. It seems very feasible to work but until they trial it in humans nothing is a sure thing. The fact is Islet transplants can be effective enough short term to get people off insulin. Its not a cure but the science is sound. The two main problems is enough supply and protection against rejection. Viacyte has supposedly addressed both those issues and is gearing up for human trials. Unless they tackle the auto immunity part the underlying disease will still be there, In an ideal world they will conquer the auto immunity with some kind of vaccine and hopefully the beta cells will start to work again to where we could stop insulin. Obviously that science is not there just yet but the latest article on the Stem Cell Educator and Dr Faustman's BCG are both showing promising results of regeneration when Auto Immunity is halted. Its really fascinating stuff though nowhere near reality at this point.

Yes, halting the autoimmunity is a major issue, and I don't see it on the horizon. And repeated transplants of beta cells aren't really my definition of a cure, although a treatment every couple of months that resulted in "normal" BGs would be better than what we currently have.

Also, the human trials would have to be completed to the satisfaction of the FDA, and we all know how capricious they are. So even if everything went smoothly, I wouldn't expect attainable results for a long time to come. And then if they WERE able to provide such a treatment, it would go to the children first, and I'm going to be a very old lady by that time! LOL!!

Natalie, your probably right that at your age you'll likely miss the boat. I think the reality is we are still a good decade away from anything being commercialized which puts even me now at 46 in an awkward age to possibly see something. I think it will eventually happen because there are just way too many research groups attacking it from every angle possible that I feel one of them will eventually prove worthwhile. Will it be a true cure? Probably not but I'd have to believe it will be far superior treatment to what we have now. I think in the next five years we will have an idea of what therapy/s have a realistic chance. For someone like you probably something like Smart Insulin would be a great solution. FWIW Brunetta is only a few years younger then you and she believes she will see a cure but I agree its a lot easier to feel no then yes.

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