So, I am a little confused. If I get the Animas Ping, I have two machines that talk to one another. If I add the CGM then I am adding another machine that doesn't talk to the other two machines? Or does it? What does it talk to? Wouldn't it make more sense to have the CGM built in to the ping meter?

Views: 725

Replies to This Discussion

I just did the training on my Dexcom 7 and the rep said that it will be some time this year! So, hopefully that will come true! I love the Dexcom so far! It is very interesting to see my trends instead of just numbers.
j.
I heard that they were redesigning the system... apparently the people trialing it didn't like what they did the first time around.

Honestly I will be shocked if we see it this year.. I think next year is more realistic. Same with Omnipod's integration.
I talked to the Animas Rep yesterday at the JDRF Retreat in St Louis. He told me they expect to intergrate the Dexcom Seven into the Animas Ping within 6 months or so. He showed me the large Dexcom meter and said - now imagine all this on the Ping. He said as it looked now that when this happens people will be able to upgrade their Ping to include the new Dexcom system for a few hundred dollars - the number he threw out was about $225.00. if anyone wanted that feature.
I think having a screen that can show trends up and down a few hours ahead etc and having an alarm that can sound for lows or highs would be nice to have.
Hope he is right on the timeframe. That would be nice to have.
Hello to all and as they say I think it's HAPPY PUMPING!, I am new to this website and I have been using syringes for 24 years and my A1C is in the high 8"s so my endo has recommended using a pump. I have chosen the Ping as it is called here and I have some questions. I figure it would be better to tweak the brains of those who are on the front line of this product.

!.How do you take a bath or shower with the pump? In other words if you have to keep the tubing and canula on for 3 days can it get wet. Where do you place the pump when swimming with it. I know its water proof but if I am skinny dipping how does anyone keep it on?

2.Can you program the meter to basal the pump for you, go to work and leave the meter at home?

3.Does anyone know of a pump with a built in cgm or word of one coming soon. A pump that at the same time as providing you with insulin it is reading your glucose as well? I could hold off I think on the ping pump if one of these will be available soon.

4.I have heard of insulin pumps potentially putting people in harm by malfunctioning and over dosing them. Does anyone have any experience with this or know of it happening to someone they know?

I know some of these questions have been ask before and I could find out from the animas rep. who I have to meet on March 1 but I wanted to get my feet wet here and get some ideas and info. Thanks to all and be blessed.
1) You can disconnect from the pump while showering. the infusion set will not be affected. For skinny dipping either disconnect, or wedge it between your cheeks :). for swimming i usually disconnect. I won't be needing insulin while exercising.
2) YOu program the pump, not the meter for your basals. The pump will continue to deliver regardless of where the meter is.
3) Animas and Dexcom are talking. We'll have to wait to see what them come up with. See previous posts
4) Pumps are programable so a maximum dose/hour cannot be exceeded. I'm not aware of any failures that have resulted in serious overdoses. there are redundant software controls built in. It could happen in theory, but I've not heard of it. With MDI's, the only thing keeping you from ODing is common sense.
I like your sense of humor David (question 1, lmao) and thanks you for the info.
Robert, I suggest you meet with a pump trainer to go over all of the functions of your pump! congrat's!!
Hello Anne, Yes I have an appointment for next week with one of the reps. for that purpose. I was advised to communicate with others who also have actual experience with these products on a daily basis to learn things that may not be discussed with the animas rep. Here was one of the places they advised. Thanks..
okay great. Yes I agree that it is great to get feedback from other pump users, as well. I just wanted to encourage you to get the official run-down, since this is your first experience with a pump.

The way I look at a pump is that it is basically a replacement insulin delivery device, but the programming of it is still all up to you. I think you will enjoy the freedom being on a pump can give. But you still have to monitor things carefully... Hopefully, soon, at least the CGM will be integrated with the Ping, as others have mentioned. I think, for a while at least, it will still be all manual programming.

A nice thing about the pump is that if you are going to exercise, you can reduce the basal rate 1-2 hours before you start. You can try something like 30% reduction. It can help you out with preventing lows that way. Still, there is always a lot of trial and error...

Also, the Ping is waterproof and I swim with mine. I just tuck it in my swimming suit (easier because I am a woman and have more options) and swim with it. I don't like to disconnect when I exercise. I exercise consistently so my basal rates more or less reflect that, and I no longer even reduce them much at all, unless I am exercising longer or harder than normal.

Cheers,
Anne
Robert: Anne is absolutely correct. Your diabetes treatment team needs to set you up with your initial treatament goals and settings and teach you how to use the pump. After you've been pumping awhile, you'll have other questions that probably only regular users can answer. Good luck and join us. You'll get comfortable very quickly with all this new technology.
1. The Ping comes with a great metal clip-- for a shower, I hook it on to a lanyard/whistle strap and wear it as a necklace. Put a boat key floaty on it and you're set for skimpy dippin!
2. I've left my meter at home a few times...I use the one touch cheepy ($19) as a backup and leave it at work and in an extra in my purse. (My endo gave me 3 extras :}) Then I just use the same meter features, but thru my pump.
4. The only negative I've had w/ proper dosing is when my cartridge gets below 20 units...doesn't give me enough. So, I change out at 20.
5-1,000 20years of MDI - 4 months of pumping and I will never go back to MDI's.!!! I feel so much better physically and mentally. NO MORE LANTUS! NO MORE WONDERING DID I...? NO MORE GUESSING....

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

An eye opening experience at @CWDiabetes!

Last month, I had one of the most amazing experiences I have had with technology since I have been living with diabetes. It happened at the Focus On Technology conference organized by Children With Diabetes in Los Angeles (the first Read on! →

World Diabetes Day at REALM Charter School

REALM Charter is a middle school full of amazing young people eager to learn about World Diabetes Day. Team DHF spent the day with over 300 students and taught them about the Big Blue Test and what they can do Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service