I guess the asking of the question contains the answer, but I'm going to put it out there anyway.

I got started less than a week ago with my new Ping. So far things are great. One problem I've had, however, is when I have the pump on my hip (clipped to my pants) and I bolus for a meal from the meter. Twice now I must have moved during the bolus and caused it to press a button on the pump and cancel and I didn't hear or feel an alarm until a couple hours later.

Should I be locking the buttons whenever I clip my pump on (probably, I guess)? Or is it possible that when I put my meter away I'm hitting a button which causes a cancel? Is this a common problem?

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I've had my Ping for nearly two years and never had this happen! It seems pretty unlikely that you could be randomly knocking against a button on the pump. Do you clip it facing in? If so, maybe turn it around - it's pretty hardy and won't be hurt. I think it's more likely you're pressing something on the meter. Do you press any button at all after you hit "go" for the bolus? Even to turn the meter off? Finally it should be alarming you if your bolus is not completed. I can't remember, but if you look in your manual you will find if this is an alarm that you need to set.

When I first got my pump I worried about random button pushing and locked my pump. It gave me peace of mind but I've since stopped doing that because I don't think random button pushing is too common. But if it makes you feel better go ahead and lock it and see if the problem stops. My vote is on the meter, though. I never turn it off until the bolus is done.

I agree with Zoe I think it is your meter that might cause it to cancel. I've had my Animas 2020/Ping (same pump unit) on my belt in open clip (face out) and leather belt pouch and NEVER/EVER had a false button pushed and I'm not a couch potato. IT IS THE METER.
Another thing besides the alarm for the bolus (vibrate) you can speed (higher steps) up the time it takes to bolus giving the pump less time to accidentally pushing a button on the meter and/or pump stopping your bolus if you have large boluses.

I've done this a few times, but normally for me it happens when I'm re-clipping the pump to my belt mid-bolus(I prefer to bolus from my pump instead of the meter...I'm weird). I guess your best bet is to just double check that the bolus finished.

Also correct me if I'm wrong, but won't pushing a button on a locked pump still cancel the bolus?

I have had my ping do this multiple times... For me, it's most likely to happen as I put the ping back into the case when starting the bolus. Some of us just grip the case differently. To help prevent this, I usually lay the pump next to my plate until the bolus finishes. This way I can fix problems if they occur and I don't touch which ever blasted button I bump when trying to put it in the case. Good luck.

This happens because you are hitting a button. (both the meter remote and the ping say on the screen "press any function button to cancel") This does happen to me occasionally, and I have a couple suggestions.
First, if you are not hearing the alarms, I recommend you set your alarms to something you don't miss. "H" is hi volume, but if you aren't hearing that, you could try "vib" for vibrate. Second, and this one is more a matter of preference, I use my meter remote to bolus almost always, keeping the pump in my pocket locked. Also helps to save batteries.
Good luck.

I usually lock my pump because I have had a few instances where the pump cancelled a bolus or accidentally bolused 0.00 units (if you hit OK enough times). Another possibility is that when your bolus is cancelled, your pump is having a hard time connecting to your meter. For some strange reason, there are spots in my house where the pump and the meter don't communicate well wirelessly. You could check the pump history to make sure the bolus completed, but that would be a pain to do every time you bolus.

Something else I usually do is wait to put away my meter until it's finished bolusing, that way I catch any errors pretty quickly.

Thanks for the insight.

I'm leaning more toward blaming the meter. Typically, I do the bolus then once it starts I remove the strip, close the case and put the meter away. It's possible that in that time I'm hitting cancel. I will keep the meter open and on until the bolus is done and see if I have any more problems.

This brings up another question -- I know the bolus stops when the meter and pump can no longer communicate. How far away can they see each other? Can I leave the meter on the kitchen counter and walk to the next room (in my house it's only about 15 feet and there's only a 1/2 height wall between)? Or do I have to carry it with me?

If I remember correctly it's 5 feet.

Today I was watching the meter as the bolus cancelled. It said that communication was lost. The meter was on my lap and the pump on my hip. It suggested that I choose a new channel for the RF communication (given that I was in a busy restaurant with a lot of Wifi access points visible and several wireless visa/debit machines at the tables and servers with wireless headsets it's not inconceivable that there was interference in the 2.4GHz band (I assume that's the frequency band that they use for RF -- it's the most common consumer band))

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