Hi, guys, has anyone here ever been on the Omnipod as well as the Ping?

Would love to hear about your experience!

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Yes - Omnipod wins hands down - so much easier to put on, never (rarely) gets pulled off - all around better.

I use the Omnipod 3 years and switched to the Ping almost a month ago. Although the omnipod is a lot easier to change out, I had nothing but problems with it the entire 3 years I had it. They had to change out the pump 2 times for malfunctions, I got error readings sometimes 3 in 2 days. Sometimes they would replace the pods for free, but the cost of a full pod thrown in the trash for errors was costing me a fortune. They will tell you they do not care about insulin they will not reimburse you or replace it. When a full pod goes bad in 6 hours you throw the pod full of insulin in the trash. I got occlusion errors and pod errors continuously for 3 years. I am getting used to the ping and although it's more of a hassle to change out every couple of days, to me it's worth it.

I have used the used the Omni Pod and currently use the Ping. Personally for me the Omni Pod was appealing because of the seemingly wireless aspect of the Pod. Regretfully my experience with that device was quite disappointing as I had many many Pod failures to the point that I could not rely on that device for my daily basil/bolus needs.

I switched to the Animas Ping and am very happy yet still have some desires in my quest for the ideal ideal pump therapy solution.

The ping has many features I like -- the remote is my glucose monitor and it connects wirelessly yet it's not as refined as I had hoped. The pump is great and love the built in carb counter but the cartridge only holds 200 ML which tuns into 189 after priming which only gives me about 1.5 days max -- which is a real bummer when you just want to focus on professional/career/travel as there is a lot of gear to plan and constantly set up.

I have my eye on the new Accu-Chek Combo which seems as it may be an upgraded version with a cartridge capacity of 310 ML which would hopefully give me three days plus. The remote has a color interface which looks appealing as well. https://www.accu-chek.co.uk/gb/products/insulinpumps/index.html

I would be interested to learn how others find the daily use of this new pump as I may migrate to it if it proves reliable in day to day use. It's from the UK so perhaps some T1's from England and Europe may have experience with it before it arrives in North America.

I was on Minimed with an Excellent A1c and switched to the Omnipod to get the tubing out of the way for athletics. I have had nothing but problems and an A1c above 8 for the last 2 years. Yeah it's a nice shape and design but when the BS shoots up over 250 for no reason or you literally get a "pod failure" reading which is one of their alarm options it makes you wonder. I am now on the Ping as it is also waterproof. I am fairly athletic as I run, bike and swim non competitively.

I would go with a Ping. A Ping can be removed and replaced for MRI/CT scans, etc. Also, if anything happens to the Pod, it is shot.

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