I've been CrossFitting for over a year and still struggle with post-WOD BS highs.

Additionally, I recently switched from insulin injections to a pump, but have been disconnecting my pump during wods because I'm afraid the thing will go flying! :P

Any advice out there?

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I'm haven't done CrossFit, but post-intensive exercise highs are a common problem that a lot of people have. You need to work out how big a bolus you need to take when your workout is done.

I do a 6mi mountain run every other day, and I've determined by experimenting that I need to turn off or disconnect my pump about 30min-1hr before the run, and then take a 2 unit bolus 5-15min after the run concludes to keep a level bg.

So I would say it's fine that you're disconnecting during the workout (because you probably wouldn't want basal insulin then anyway unless you went into the workout with a very high bg), and you should try giving yourself a small afterworkout bolus and then increase the dose each WO until you get yourself level. As always, doing WOs at the same time each day helps a lot. Also, if the WOs vary, you may need a different bolus after each.

I am a type 1 diabetic an have been doing Crossfit for 6 years! It is a really hard thing to deal with but have found I need insulin when I do a wod and I usually have to end up lowering my basel rate a few hours after! It is a really tricky thing and it has taken me years to get it together! I have only had my pod ripped off my body by the barbell one time and it DID NOT HURT!! I love Crossfit!! : o )

I went through the same thing when I switched from doing basic cardio to doing more cross-fit and intensive strength training. I'd never worn my pump to the gym before or to play sports but found that when I starting doing cross fit and strength training I definitely needed to. My suggestion is keep it on (find workout pants with pockets and pin the pocket shut) and don't adjust your basal levels and pay attention to your body. As long as you have a snack handy just in case it can't hurt. I found that my BS was often rising for up to an hour and a half after a hard strength training workout so sometimes I would just do an additional unit or two of insulin with my post workout meal and it would all even out. Hope that helps.

I agree, if you are taking your pump off for 60 to 90 min, this could easily be a reason for your sugars to rise..i take my pump off for Bikram Yoga or Swimming and for sure my sugar is rising afterwards, and when i get out i do an immediate bolus to make up for the insulin i missed..with that said, i did a 2 hour bike ride today with a group and turned my basal down to 50%,(because i am trying to lose weight and so i dont want to have to eat so much food during this ride)..so then when i get done with cycling for 2 hours and having missed my basal for 2hours, AND THE FACT THAT SOMETIMES AFTER A WORKOUT, your hormones are still working, and these cause your sugar to rise..all these things depend alot on your workout rate,sometimes a heartrate monitor is good to see this..with all diabetes things,each body is different..that is why i recommend a CGM/Dexcom..so when you decide to do something different, you can get some instant feedback..if you live in Chicago you should check out the local Diabetic Exercise Sports Group, that i use to help organize..AmynChicago@gmail.com Amy and Veronica, are now running this group of 50-80 type1 athletes

Thanks everyone for all of the feedback/suggestions!! I think that being so new to a pump, I'm still getting used to wearing it comfortably, but I'll try both wearing it during work outs and disconnecting and see what works best.

I would echo what Anna above said, that I have been on the pump for 7 or 8 years and ripped it out several times and while it is a little scary/shocking the first time it happens, it doesn't hurt, especially if you already have your adrenaline pumping in your workout. It sucks because you have to stop and handle your pump, but it is ok. I remember being really anxious about it getting ripped out when I first started and then I was relieved to realize it was only inconvenient, not the catastrophe I'd imagined. Good luck!

first CrossFit WOD Jan. 2008 - I try to predict how my body will react and how well my pump will stay on. I first did CrossFit in the State Patrol Academy and never wore it for fear that we would have to do something crazy that would break the pump. Now that I do my own at the gym rather than with a DI screaming in my ear I wear it and just figure the days that call for 1-1-1-1 it wont jump my BS - on the days of Fran and Helen I will give a 1 unit bump after the WOD

Im not crossfitting right now but have in the past. I would not recommend taking off your pump because later you'll not have enough insulin on board. Weight lifting tends to raise bs vs cardio seems to make it drop. There are many belts/cases to keep your pump close/tight to your body you could buy on amazon. There is an awesom diabetic fitness coach who holdslike 15 records in lifting, her name is Ginger Vieira you can look her up on google, facebook or on here too I beleive. She helped me stablizing my sugars during ANY exersize. I usually have 15 carbs preworkout bolus for half that amount stay in anarobic, like weights or interval cardio and Im golden. We are all different and have different needs also time of day is a factor. Im stoked to see so many diabetics working out! Kim

Everyone's different. Try wearing it and working out without it as well as keeping a log or mental note of what your BS was before you worked out and what you ate. Weights make my BS drop fast, especially working out with my trainer. I have the omnipod and typically suspend it going in and make sure I'm about 175, but even then sometimes I can drop towards the end of the workout and have to chug a gatorade. Just depends on the intensity of the workout for me.

check out superstarch http://eatingacademy.com/sports-and-nutrition/introduction-to-super... it could help you stay even ??? it looks like the best option for us T1's rather than the G-raid

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