I want one so bad!!!!!!!!

Views: 158

Replies to This Discussion

I am lucky in that my Blue Cross coverage through work pays 100% for my pump and supplies. But I think that coverage for everyone would be great. However, last week I was in Ontario at a conference and met a pumper from Ontario who says that his experience with a provincial program is not everything I expected. They are a lot more strict on meeting with a nurse every three months and they go over all your numbers to see how you are doing (which makes sense as they are making the investment, but I wouldn't look forward to having that much scrutiny).

As the province just sends out cheques every three months for supplies, some parents are leaving infusion sets in their kids (or themselves) for a lot longer than 3 days. That way they save some of the money that the province sends them. I am not a big fan of that - if Alberta follows through with the promise, I hope that they pay the pharmacy and not the person directly.

The person I was talking to in Ontario also mentioned that as soon as the province brought in coverage, his private coverage stopped. Which makes sense - why would private insurance pay for something that the province pays for.

I would be happy if they brought in a pump program as I know quite a few people who cannot get one covered through their private insurance and can't afford it on their own.

Yeah,
Luckily it's the same situation for me. My Dad gets health insurance through his work and it will most likely cover most, if not all of the cost of my pump. I have only been a diabetic for two weeks though haha. So I've still got a bit to wait before we can even look at getting me one.... ): I think that what the PC party is doing will indeed save the province money in the long run. There would be less risk of diabetes-related complications if everyone who would benefit from a pump had one.

I'm in Alberta also. I go for pump training starting June 5! I have $4,000 covered through my health plan.

Yay!!! Good luck to you and congrats on thr pump.

I think first of all, before starting on a pump, people have to really be prepared for the work that goes into managing diabetes on a pump and be prepared for the initial frustration of the trial and error to get the settings correct for your body. I can understand wanting one and have been on a pump since 2000 and would NEVER go back, but it is definitely not as "easy" to manage diabetes on a pump as it is with MDI. It is a whole different world.

I fully support the Alberta government in covering pumps. I am working to try and get the same for BC (BC only covers kids). I do think, however, that there should be criteria that one must meet to be covered. I dont agree with "A1c should be less than X" though because we all know you can make an A1c look good on paper and be doing a lot of damage to your body. I think it is far more important to be STABLE than to focus so much on the number in the moment. JMO though and its worked well for me. People would cringe at my A1c, BUT my eyes, for example, before my pump had spots that my opthamologist wanted to laser but we kept putting it off. Those spots have all disappeared, much to his surprise as he says that doesn't generally happen. That is the beauty of a pump and yet my A1c is still higher than anyone cares it to be.

RSS

Advertisement



REsources

From the Diabetes Hands Foundation blog...

TuDiabetes Is Getting A Makeover!

Written By Emily Coles, TuDiabetes Community Manager. Last summer we surveyed members of TuDiabetes and EsTuDiabetes online communities, and gained some GREAT insights! We learned that our members are happy with the information and support they receive on TuDiabetes and Read on! →

An eye opening experience at @CWDiabetes!

Last month, I had one of the most amazing experiences I have had with technology since I have been living with diabetes. It happened at the Focus On Technology conference organized by Children With Diabetes in Los Angeles (the first Read on! →

Diabetes Hands Foundation Team

DHF TEAM

Manny Hernandez
(Co-Founder, Editor, has LADA)

Emily Coles
(Head of Communities, has type 1)

Mila Ferrer
(EsTuDiabetes Community Manager, mother of a child with type 1)

Mike Lawson
(Head of Experience, has type 1)

Corinna Cornejo
(Development Manager, has type 2)

Desiree Johnson  (Administrative and Programs Assistant, has type 1)

DHF VOLUNTEERS


Lead Administrator

Brian (bsc) (has type 2)


Administrators

Lorraine (mother of type 1)
Marie B (has type 1)

DanP (has Type 1)

Gary (has type 2)

David (has type 2)

 

LIKE us on Facebook

Spread the word

Loading…

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

© 2014   A community of people touched by diabetes, run by the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

Badges  |  Contact Us  |  Terms of Service