Hi guys, I have a question that I hope some of you have an answer to! I was diagnosed about 4 months ago, and I was told I'm likely a T1D (still waiting on test results to confirm that). I'm on both Novo Rapid and Levemir, but as of right now I'm honeymooning and am taking almost no insulin at all, either basal or fast acting. Is this normal? Has it happened to anyone else? Or does it mean I'm maybe an LADA? If anyone could help at all that would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers!

-Ali

Tags: LADA, T1D, honeymoon, period

Views: 165

Replies to This Discussion

How much is "almost no insulin"?

I was diagnosed a month ago. I only take 3 units of NovoRapid before meals and 10 units of Lantus before bed. My blood glucose levels are in the 4s most of the day. I also eat low-carb and avoid stuff like breads, rice, potatoes and pastas for the most part. What is your diet like? Lots of carbs? Little carbs? When I do indulge in an oatmeal cookie I'm reminded that I'm totally diabetic, unfortunately :/

I think it's hard to give you an opinion on what's normal not knowing what you're eating, what your bg is, what your insulin doses are, etc.

As of right now, I'm only bolusing when I eat things like bread or pasta and even then I'm using a 1:30 ratio (for some reason potatoes seem to be ok). I generally eat pretty low carb. And as of last night I tried stopping my Levemir because I was going low in the middle of the day without bolusing. I was on 6 units at night. So far today there's been 0 insulin and BG's are in the 4s.

Hi Aconnell - my daughter was diagnosed last November. We were told her bg fasting results were accurate w/her diagnosis - no other test results were completed. So, I'm curious what test results they are still waiting for and why they would start you on a rx plan without being certain. My daughter has just ended her honeymoon period. She was like you - very little insulin (we are not high carb eaters either) and she even went 2-3 weeks without any (no basal and no bolus!). The endo. recommended she still take a trace amount, even when she wasn't requiring any, as studies show that this may prolong the honeymoon period - the remaining beta cells are not having to work as hard w/ a little external help. No insulin in the honeymoon period is not really common we were told but it does happen. Of course, it was emotionally challenging - everyone thought she was "cured" except the doctors and us. Enjoy your honeymoon period!

Thanks for the info! They're doing the tests for antibodies, since I was older at diagnosis (26). They said they were 99% sure they're right based on how the symptoms presented, but they still wanted the other tests done anyways to confirm

To answer how this could/would happen, the only way to know with 100% certainty what type of diabetes you have is with a C-peptide (unless things have changed but this is my understanding). It gets complicated when youre not in the normal age groups for T1D. They used to think if you are a child, you have type 1 and an adult is type 2. But they now know that's not always the case. The C-peptide tells them if you are producing insulin and how much, which tells them type 1 or 2. But in the meantime, they do have to guess (though I would think they should get the results pretty quickly) and insulin is probably the easiest as a treatment.

From 2 sources ...which may answer your questions ??....and my suggestion aconnell is to pose your question on the main page as well ?? Larger Audience .

http://www.joslin.org/info/will_diabetes_go_away.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honeymoon_period_%28diabetes%29
I recall 29 years ago and only using 2 units daily for some time ; I did need insulin as I was put on meds for about 5-6 weeks and numbers did not come down till I started using insulin .From my non medical perspective : I believe you are a type 1 ...title may not necessarily matter ; treatment to keep BG numbers in the range does. Be well

Hi there
I was diagnosed T1 in July of 2011 at the age of 45. At this point in time, I take 7 units of Lantus in the morning and take anywhere between 1 and 5 units prior to meals, depending upon what I'm eating and doing. My endo said that, due to my late onset of T1, I could stay like this, in a somewhat honeymoon period, for the rest of my life (he's got a couple of patients just like me) or my pancreas could truly and finally shut down like a normal T1. My insulin requirements have stayed pretty much the same since I was diagnosed and I maintain my BG levels between 4-7 so your guess is as good as mine as to what the future will bring. One thing I've concluded in the past year and a half...none of us are the same! Best of luck...Barb

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