Here's the deal: when I'm off the bike, my goal range is 90-120, based on 2-hour postprandials. This is not to say that I never pig out and go way higher than I should, or that I don't rebound high after some things, but I'm very uncomfortable seeing readings higher than 110-120 for more than an hour.

When I get on the bicycle, I average 12-13 mph on the flats, closer to 10 mph when I have to worry about hills (my climbing sucks and I'm often-enough walking the vehicle uphill).

For most shorter rides (under 20 miles round-trip) this isn't an issue, but for longer rides, it is.

My two issues are electrolyte replacement and in-ride nutrition. If I ignore electrolyte replacement, the second I stop my blood pressure will drop low enough for me to feel faint for several hours -- but if I take in any electrolyte fluid (even sugar-free, carb-free ones), I will go up beyond 150 and stay there. Similarly, since my bg's don't drop into an obvious "you need carbs" zone (under 100), if I pay attention to what my legs are feeling and what the HRM is reporting (heart rate, calories burned) and eat pretty much anything, I will go up somewhere near 200 and settle back into the 130's for the duration. Because I have to monitor sodium (I'm on blood pressure medication) and protein (I have been treated for iron-deficiency anemia), I tend to favor Luna Bars and Larabars. I've tried Sport Beans once, but not in a manner to draw any conclusions; ditto with an Accelerade gel this past weekend (issue: not testing frequently enough to catch behaviors).

Other than saying, "heck with it -- I'm burning through the calories, I'll ride high and be high for a few hours afterwards" are there techniques or suggestions I should try?

Tags: bicycling, cycling, endurance exercise, endurance sports, sports nutrition, t2, type 2

Views: 50

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As far in-ride nutrition goes on my shrot ride(26 miles) I generally carry two bottles use 32GI as my drink and the other plain water. I always carry a PVM bar or two as well as a Hammer Gel in case of a low. On my wekend rides, anything from 43 to 75 miles I always carry food with me, generally a peanut butter and jam, I believe you call it jelly sandwhich, low GI brown bread. I do find that whatever energy bar I use, the longer it takes to chew the longer the effect is which works well for me. You could also look at the Hammer energy drinks which do cater for diabetics. I find that this covers both the areas you are concerned about for me.
What's a PVM bar?
I am not sure if they are only made in South Africa but it is almost toffee like in it's consistancy. Takes a bit of time to chew threw it and don't talk while chewing it as you end up looking like an unsupervised 2 year old at a birthday party. You can Google it.
Hello from montana, I am a type 1 sponsored athlete by hammer nutrition, I try not to eat 3hrs before a workout then I monitor bg before and after and fuel as needed I have figured what and how much I need what works really well is Perpetuem Solids tablets 3 tablets have 3g sugar, 20g carbs so i just take 1 tablet every 15 miles, when I cycle, + Heed drink mix in half dose.I hope that helps you, we all have to figure what works by keep testing. take care bob.
That is interessting Bob. I don't know the products you are referring to (Perpetuem Solids) but I must say I tend to have something to eat before a ride, probably on my wifes insistance but I do prefer a snack, but as you rightly pointed out it is all about trial and error and what works for you. Am I correct in that Heed is a sub of Hammer? Of all the gels I have used I find they are they slowest release and the least spiking I have experienced. The longest single stage ride I have done is 143 miles and food is an essential for us backmarkers. The racing snakes do it in about 8hours 15min (record) and I have an 18 hr and two 16,30 hr so it is a long time out there for us. PS Hello from South Africa.
Yes that is correct its a Hammer product, a new one that is very rider friendly, yea some times a gel or fuel right before a ride is great too just don't want to be full of food- most or some of your energy is going towards the digestion of food where it could be used for your body to work better. have great Day.
I will try that sometime and see how it goes. Happy riding mate.
I think I tried Heed once or twice at full strength -- not too high in sodium but taste was awfully tame for the suggested dilution and it sent me high (half strength? may need to try that).

I usually take Ultima Replenisher since it's a full-spectrum electrolyte replenisher (Na, K, Zn, Mn, Cr, Mo, Cl, Ca, selenium, vanadium as well as vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, folid acid, biotin, pantothenic acid, plus choline and inositol, sweetened with stevia)... so far the only full-spectrum replenisher I've found and not hugely high in sodium (37.5 mg per packet, 2 packets per bottle, 10 calories/ 3 g carb per packet.

In summer I find I need to pace about two sports bottles of fluid per hour riding,but I haven't calculated electrolytes perfectly (just, if I'm feeling faint when I stop, I didn't take enough of them -- and if I start getting a headache, I probably need a glucose-tab's worth of carbs regardless of what the meter says).

I'll look for the other stuff next time I'm in the cycle shop -- probably tomorrow if The Other Half gets his requested day off so I can pre-register for Sunday's Tour de Cure.

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