Hi all! Summer is beginning and I was wondering if anyone had any tips, experiences, etc. with using the dexcom when you go swimming. Do you use any shower patches on the site or tegaderm over it? It is only waterproof for 30 mins at 3 ft water and I plan on swimming longer than 30mins but I LOVE my dexcom and I dont want to take it out for when I just go swimming. Any tips or ideas? Also, where do you put the receiver? Ziplock bag on the side of the pool?
Thanks!!!!

Tags: dexcom, shower, swimming, transmitter

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i have noticed my transmitter sticking much better since i have cleaned the area before i apply the sensor...i clean it with rubbing alcohol 90(instead of the 70...from the physics, that means you are using 90% alcohol and 10% water)...rubbing alcohol 90 can also be found at the Walgreens/CVS stores..a little more expensive then 90 but still only $3 a bottle...this makes it a little stronger alcohol content and better at killing and getting rid of any oil,dirt,etc..the cleaner the surface the better things will stick...since i have been using the isopropyl alcohol 90, my sensors having sticking better and longer...i usually leave the reciever on the side of the pool or in the boat...i can usually tell from my graph's, wether i am flatlining, going up or down...because i have no insurance and want to get my sensor to stay in as long as i can(i usually get at least 12-14 days from one sensor before removing)...after the sensor is glued down, i then take this stuff called SkinTac(you can buy at a specialty medical store or online)..it comes in a bottle with a sponge applicator...i will slowly remove the sponge applicator from the bottle and carefully remove all excess from the sponge before i take out of the bottle(i do this because i dont want to waste and also not to get this sticky stuff everywhere)...then i slowly apply this around the sensor to the bandage material and this gives it a little extra glue to make the bandage stick better..hope this helps, any questions email me back
Well I swim and waterski all the time with mine. I usually just leave the reciever in the boat or on dry land. I haven't had any trouble with the transmitter either. I have been swiming and floating with it on for more than 30 minutes with no problems. I just ALWAYS make sure to dry off the "tape" that holds the sensor to the skin everytime I get out of the water. Just take your towel and push down firmly on the "tape" to dry it well and it helps it stick better too (in my opinion). I do put my hand over the sensor when jumping into the water just in case it were to fall off I wouldn't lose the transmitter. Good luck and don't worry about it that much. You'll be fine!
So you dont cover the transmitter when you go swimming ?
I dont cover anything as my bathing suit is natural covering.
I'm impressed! When I wake board I fall often and hit the water hard! I'd be afraid the sensor and transmitter would get torn off.
I do nothing extra and swim 3 times a week. I wear a bathing suit that covers my belly so there is never an issue. Tapes dries pretty quick. The receiver is in gym bag in locker roomand takes 10 minutes to readjust after hook back up. Good luck.
I was on a cruise last year and spent plenty of time in the water. I use Skintac when I put a new transmitter on. It works great. As far as the receiver goes I bought a camera water pack called Aquapac. Th receiver and money/room key fits and it is completely water proof.
I just got my Dexcom last week and still have my first sensor in. (I love it by the way!). I'm training for a sprint triathlon and spend longer than 30 minutes in the pool. I called Dexcom about this yesterday. The rep said that the transmitter was tested at 3 ft and is guaranteed for 30 minutes at that depth. He did not recommend scuba diving with it. He also said it should be fine for longer if you're spending your time at the surface. I also asked about hot tubs. He couldn't comment because it wasn't tested in a hot tub...

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