I want the dexcom sensor.Mainly because of the fact that I had a really bad scare 3 months ago,but I was really excited for the cgm....researching and looking for certain brands that I like.I finally decided the dexcom was my absolute favorite.I went to my doctor that next week or so and asked him about it..He told me that it was a bad idea that they don't work very well,That people especially teens get tired of it!!! He did not recommend it for me or anyone at all.I was wondering what yall though about it,do you like it? do you have trouble having two devices attached to you? I really want it but I don't want to go against my Dr.'s word.....anything that you have to say would be absolutely awesome!!! thanks! =)

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Personally, I learned more about being diabetic (and how my body reacts to food/insulin) in the first five weeks wearing the Dex than I had in the previous five years. I almost feel lost without it. It is not perfect, but I find it a valuable tool.
Love it. If I had to choose between my pump and Dexcom, I would choose Dexcom 10 out of 10 times.

That's not to say it doesn't have some issues. You still have to do finger sticks, and the readings on the receiver is not gospel. But to see trends is priceless.
I have had my Dexcom for 4 weeks now, and it has literally saved my life several times. The low bg alarms and the arrows that let you know how quickly your blood sugars are rising or dropping have given me the ability to make informed decisions regarding what to do and how to act on that information. Coupled with my glucometer and my pump....it is awesome! I don't know how your doctor can be so opposed to you having so much information. Knowledge is power, and having even a portion of power over our diabetes is amazing. Your doctor isn't God. He is not all knowing. If all else fails, I would get a different endocrinologist - one who supports good diabetes care and decisions.

My doctors office has a plaque in their waiting room. It says 'what would you do if you knew you could not fail?' I for one would LIVE life more fully, and dare to be actively engaged in my life. I've been doing that more the past few years on the pump then I ever have before. And when I want to run out the door and go for a walk, a hike, a bike ride, or just a trip to the grocery store...with the Dex I now will have real time knowledge as to what my bg's are doing to keep myself (and others) safe while I am living without fear of the unknown.

And it will keep me out of the hospital - cause those lows I'm not feeling anymore, ya, they can be dangerous to me and to others. I haven't had to be hospitalized with my diabetes yet, and I hope never to have to be. Worse than that would be sending someone else to the hospital because of my diabetes. What keeps that from happening? The right tools and the right information and KNOWLEDGE. Knowledge is powerful. I test by bg's 10-12 times a day already, and I was missing all sorts of trends. And when my bg's are dropping so fast and I don't even feel it, to have the Dex alert me to that blood sugar action is essential! Sorry, you caught me on my 'soap box' today. I don't work for Dexcom....I'm just a regular person battling daily against a disease that is really lame. But managable with the right tools. I would recommend a Dex for sure!
Thanks this helped a great deal!!! and I dont mind you soapboxing lol
My Dexcom is my favorite piece of equipment. It is a pain to carry it around, sometimes the alarms don't wake me, and sometimes it hurts to insert a sensor. But the piece of mind I get with my Dex is worth all of it. When I have a sensor that isn't working as well or worse, if I have a failed sensor and it's a couple hours before I can replace it I do far more glucose checks than I ever did before I had the Dex. Can it be a pain, yes, absolutely. In my opinion is it worth it, definitely! Don't let your doctor scare you off of this. If you're willing to do the work it will change your life and the way you manage your diabetes.
if you have severe lows, volatile numbers, or low unawareness, then a CGM is a must. we love our daughters dex. like some other posters said, we learned so much with the dex, things like my daughters insulin wasn't working the way that is should, causing her A1C to be higher than it should (we switched insulins right away). I also won't dose now without knowing her trends. As for not working well, i would say that 90% of the time her dex is within 10 points of her finger poke, and if it starts going way off then we know it is time to change sensors. if she leaves her dex behind we all feel absolutely lost.
CGMs are getting better and better as far as accuracy, and i would say your doc is going on some outdated info.
I did not ask my doc. I told her this is something to help me. and dexcom did the rest. my dex makes me feel like i have control and I love that. I wont give it up for anything
I would strongly suggest getting a 2nd medical opinion in addition to what you're getting here, you've done the research, had the problems, not your doctor. I've had one for about a year - have found that it helps identify trends very well. Is it perfect - no, but definitely provides a lot more information than I was getting by finger sticks several times a day - and no more night time lows (due in part to what we discovered with BG variations by using the Dexcom). My 12 year old just got one - she wants to know where her BGs are - so again counter to what your doc has said. No problem with 2 devices attached either.
Thanks so Much everyone!! yall just solidified m decision..I'm going to get a second opinion and then talk to my insurance and see if they can cover me! thanks again for all the advice!
Best of luck to everyone
God Bless
The Doctor is struggling with the issue if you are capable working with the current CGMS technology and being able to work with its warts and wrinkles working off the interstitial tissue.

Due to the delays of the interstialial tissue and the filtering delays of the unit, it is critical to integrate use of the caveman $ 20 fingerstick machine in conjunction with CGMS to get good results and realize when one sees big differences between caveman machine and CGMS; the CGMS is not wrong - just playing catchup.

That said, the power of watching the trends throught day and while you are asleep and its alarms is extremely powerfull.

Possibly your good Doctor does not feel you have patience and background to manage with the wrinkles to get excellent results. It takes about a month or a bit more to get fully acclimated.

As I had a bunch of liver problems, l now really appreciate the power of the CGMS notwithstanding my quibbles with Dexcom and the lack of upfront guidance to get one to understand how it best fits in and coping with a body that can dyamically change BG levels faster than CGMS can track and the speed of the insulin one is on.

Today after being exercised through hell, I would be lost if I took mine out.

Best wishes and good luck.

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