Hi you all. My son Micah, type 1 using the OminPod and Dexcom, is in need of some help from his fellow Dexcom users for a school project. If you could take a few seconds out of your time to answer some questions for him it will be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

These are the questions:

1. Do you ever wear your sensor longer than the 7 days? If yes, how many days can you get out of it with good readings?

2. Where do you wear your sensor?

3. If you wear your sensor on somewhere other than your stomach, which spot have you found to give you the best readings?

4. How often do you charge your battery?

5. What are your feelings about the wait time for starting a new sensor?

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1. Do you ever wear your sensor longer than the 7 days? If yes, how many days can you get out of it with good readings?
Not usually.

2. Where do you wear your sensor? abdomen - vertically because of my tossing and turning during sleep.

3. If you wear your sensor on somewhere other than your stomach, which spot have you found to give you the best readings? It and pump (Ping) alternate in upper half of stomach.

4. How often do you charge your battery? Battery recharges.

5. What are your feelings about the wait time for starting a new sensor? The sensor must get "wet" with interstitial fluid. After this it must stabilize its current production. I believe the value could be lower based on the fact I have two receivers and one transmitter. The 168 hour limit is in the receiver. I have played some games with the two receivers and found the 2 hours is reasonable.

Great project!

1. Yes. I can usually get about between 10-12 days out of it (3-5 extra days)
2. I've worn it on my stomach & on my the back of my upper arm.
3. I get equally good readings on both sites.
4. I charge it every 2-3 days.
5. I feel like 2 hours is a long time to wait. I wish it would be faster.

Good luck with your school project!

I just started, so my answers may not be exactly what you like. I used the Navigator for 2 years before switching to Dexcom last month. My answers are somewhat colored by my experiences.

1. I wore my first sensor for 14 days, and was still getting good readings from it.
2. I wear it on my stomach--the insertion process seems unwieldy for me to attempt to try it anywhere else.
3. ---
4. New device--battery appears to last longer than 3days, but I recharge it any wat every third night.
5. Wait time--far better than the Navigator 10 hours, but the accuracy is much better after 24 hours.

This post has been approved by the TuDiabetes Administrative Team.

1. I average 10 days per sensor occasionally 14. I usually pull it at 14, readings aren't as reliable plus tape is coming loose and don't want to lose it.
2. Thighs or abdomen.
3. I get good readings on both sites but it lasts longer on my thighs. I think there's less wear and tear from clothing plus it's over a straight portion of my anatomy and I'm really short waisted so it's harder to find a site on my abdomen that doesn't end up rubbing on something at some point.
4. I usually end up charging receiver every 4 days.
5. I don't have an issue with the warm up period. It is what it is.

Good luck with your project.

1. I wear my sensor 2 weeks unless it starts peeling up...

2. I wear my sensor on my arm

3. My arm seems to give better readings than my stomach. It also tends to stay in place longer.

4. Every 2 to 3 days.

5. I can live with it... Shorter would be nice, but it isn't a big deal

Good luck on your project!

Micah, here's my answers:
1. Do you ever wear your sensor longer than the 7 days? If yes, how many days can you get out of it with good readings? YES! I usually average about 12-13 days before it goes ???

2. Where do you wear your sensor? Usually on my abs/side love handle area. Recently on my hip...that's a little funky though.

3. If you wear your sensor on somewhere other than your stomach, which spot have you found to give you the best readings? That hip has good readings, but it was pretty tender for a couple of days and I found myself just hoping the sensor would go bad so I could get a replacement AND have a good reason to take it off early. Well into the 2nd week now, and it is still punching out some very accurate numbers though, and the soreness wore off after about day 3. Even been to water aerobics with this site and the tape is still sticking like glue!

4. How often do you charge your battery? about every 3 days

5. What are your feelings about the wait time for starting a new sensor? No problems at all. It could be worse (I've read about different CGMS that have a much longer wait time). 2 hours is fine with me, though I find myself getting a little antsy without that BG info right at the push of a button for that long!

1. I usually get two restarts out of my sensor the readings between 8 and 21 days are the best. Sometimes I gat a third restart but during that forth week it usually goes bad. The longest time I have worn a sensor is 29days.

2. I use my arms, legs, back, and stomach. I prefer the arms and legs. The back is good but I don't get as many days from a sensor (plus I can't insert it myself. The stomach is the worst place for me.

3. The arms and back give me the best readings.

4. When I first started on the Dex (almost 2 years ago) I was checking it all the time and had to charge every 2-3 days. Now I let it do its thing and hardly ever check it. I charge it when I get down to one bar but have no idea how long that takes maybe every 6-8 days.

5. Not a big deal would be nice to be shorter but I can live with it.

1. Sometimes I will try to get more than 7 days (maybe 2-3 additional days) if the sensor is performing well and the adhesive is still working.

2. Stomach on the right side.

3. n/a

4. Every 3 days or so. I have a charger at my desk at the office so easy to plug it in for an hour or so.

5. I wish it were shorter, but two hours isn't bad.

Good luck on your project!

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