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Dexcom Users

For users of a Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring ("CGM") device

Just as a reminder with the recent release of the new Dexcom G4 to the US market--it is NOT okay to post about previous models or older sensors as being 'for sale' on this site.

It is a violation of the Terms of Use because it is a prescription device, and any such efforts will unfortunately be removed.

We encourage you to donate supplies to non-profits such as the Charles Ray III Diabetes Association (http://www.cr3diabetes.org), which accepts unexpired glucometer and insulin pump supplies, or alternatively you may talk to your physician's office or other local medical group to discuss donating them to those in need of assistance.

Thank you all for kindly refraining from this activity.

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Diabetes Forum

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Comment Wall

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Comment by Rickst29 on January 20, 2012 at 10:05pm

Doug: because the Transmitter is a fully-sealed device, it (supposedly) "can't" break in a way which exposes the battery.

But the Receiver... hmmm, IMO it IS suitable for hazardous waste disposal (the 'paid-for' kind, not the lazy 'we'll take the light bulbs and car batteries we sell' kind.

This is a Gel battery in foil (not in strong packaging) If the Receiver case breaks open when the garbage truck guys run their "trash-squisher" thingy, it can theoretically get torn open and leak.

Here's what I've done: I've simply never thrown away my old, dead ones. When my city GETS A CLUE!!! and implements a proper hazardous waste disposal, then I'll take them in -- all at once.

The battery in the Transmitter is probably very dangerous (maybe even to breathe fumes). But it won't get broken apart by regular trash handling, and the plastic will hold together for hundreds of years in a typical landfill. (in the desert, where I live, it probably won't leak for several THOUSAND years.) The Transmitter is breakable, under a lot of force, and would spill it's gel/fluid if the battery foil got torn. IMO, you should not let it get handled as regular trash.

Comment by Rickst29 on January 20, 2012 at 5:04pm

For Rascal Richard:
The FDA requires that prescription meds and DME "consumable supplies" have an expiration date. But, that can be as long as a year.

That's not the issue with the Sensors. Dexcom limits the "not guaranteed for use after" dates to 6 months, because the reagents do have some degradation over time. And that time is temperature dependent: In comparision to "normal" indoor temps, you can gain a couple more months by keeping them in a wine fridge, at 50-55F. But less than about 40F is WORSE for lifespan than room temperature. So a regular refrigerator isn't a great idea, unless you keep it well above freezing.

The date on the label isn't describing an "off like a LIGHT SWITCH" situation. Degradation occurs over time. Dexcom switched the time limit which THEY are willing to guarantee a few years ago- it used to be only 3 months.

Comment by Rickst29 on January 20, 2012 at 4:49pm

The Receiver contains a rechargeable battery. After 12-18 months of charge/discharge cycles, it can't accept (and hold) very much energy per charge cycle anymore. The battery wears out, just like a NiMH "AA" flashlight battery. (Although the battery in the Dexcom Reciever *is not* NiMH, it appears to be a type of Lithium Gel cell.)

The Transmitter contains a SINGLE-USE battery, with extremely high energy density. The chemicals are dangerous, so please don't go digging in there with a sledgehammer. I think that our use-once, never recharge 11-15 month battery is a far bettery deal than Minimed's rechargeable- which wears out, in the same way as the Dexcom RECEIVER, much faster. And the unit costs more.

The plastic Sensor pad contains nothing except the two contacts, and the carefully-built connection between those contacts and the Sensor wire. Go ahead and break one apart after you've used it, and you'll see that there isn't any room for a battery.

Even if I pretend that I'd never seen one before, you can figure it out from the simple fact that the Transmitter begins to loose range (effective distance) over time. If it was getting a fresh power supply with every new Sensor, that wouldn't happen!

Power is within the clip-in Transmitter itself, and the battery lasts a pretty long time.

Comment by Richard157 on January 20, 2012 at 3:27pm

Thanks Doug, Lauren and Mossdog!!

Comment by MossDog on January 20, 2012 at 1:01am

Doug:
Check out Dexcom's website. It says right on it the battery is in the receiver not the sensor. I have heard of people using the sensors a couple years old without a problem although that is a use at your own risk kind of thing. Also, you have to have lot numbers and what not to get a sensor replaced and all of that let's Dexcom know when the expiration date was so the warranty is void at that point anyway.

Comment by Lauren on January 19, 2012 at 4:01pm

To answer your question #2: I notice more of a difference when there is something (me) between the sensor and the receiver, not distance. I typically wear my sensors on the upper part of the back of my arm, and will carry the receiver either in the back pocket of my jeans or in my jacket pocket on the same side of my body. If I put it in the pockets on the other side, I'll get the ???. I have similar problems when I sleep: If I happen to roll over onto the sensor, the mattress is in the way so I'll get the ??? alarm. So I just roll over again and get off of it. I don't have to move the receiver any closer--just so nothing is between the two pieces. I hope that makes sense!

Comment by Richard157 on January 19, 2012 at 2:35pm

I have a few questions:

1.) The sensor I am using expired in late 2010, but it is working very well. So why is there an expiration date. Is it so they can sell more?

2.) When I have my receiver on one hip and the sensor is close to the other hip, then there is a bulge between them...my lower abdomen. The receiver displayed the ??? and I moved the receiver close to the sensor. It did not take very long for the ??? to vanish, and I started seeing accurate numbers again. I have to wear the receiver close to the sensor, and not have any interference between them. Is it the same for the rest of you?

3.) I am having to recharge every 2 or 3 days. I don't remember doing it that often in 2010. Why do you think this is necessary now. The system I am using is new, and I started using it just 6 days ago.

Comment by Allen on January 19, 2012 at 11:27am

Welcome back Richard. I was hoping you were OK.

Comment by Richard157 on January 18, 2012 at 5:47pm

I'm back!! I lost coverage of my Dexcom in Nov, 2010 and dropped out of this group. In Dec, 2011 I called Dexcom to see what it would cost for me to buy a new Dexcom system, out of pocket. I told them I had very little money to spare, and I praised the Dexcom highly. Then I was connected to a man who offered me a great deal. He said that a new Dexcom 7+ system, at that time, would cost $1200. Then he said they were giving a special offer to former users who wanted to return. The offer would end on Dec 31. I bought a new system for $519. I couldn't resist. I also ordered one box of sensors, but will buy only one box per year. I will use the sensors for trips we take, and other occasions where I may have control problems. They are costing me $324 per box.

I am currently using an old sensor that expired in late 2010. It is working very well. I have almost had flatlines for 12 hour periods with this sensor, but I cannot eliminate the awful spikes 1-2 hours after breakfast. Still working on that.

Comment by Andrew Tumsuden on January 18, 2012 at 4:20pm
Just disappointing they find loop holes to not cover something
 

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